7,183 reputation
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bio website lightandmatter.com
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visits member for 1 year, 10 months
seen 3 hours ago

I live in LA and enjoy day hikes, backpacking, rock climbing, and mountaineering.


16h
comment Site with statistics of mountaineering accidents
@Nick: Interesting. I stand corrected. Sounds dicey trying to maneuver a helicopter into position for that type of rescue, though...!?
2d
comment Site with statistics of mountaineering accidents
@Nick: Helicopters are seldom used in search and rescue, and I doubt that they're used at all in canyoneering rescues. Normally the people who are rolling out of bed are volunteer S&R people, who drive to the trailhead, hike in, and, if necessary, use ropes for the rescue. If you want to minimize time between an accident and being rescued, make sure that other people know where you are, when you're expected back, and how long to wait before calling 911. Stay where you are to make it easier for them to find you.
Jan
28
comment Site with statistics of mountaineering accidents
It seems unlikely to me that statistics on mountaineering accidents would tell you much about canyoneering accidents.
Jan
26
comment What knot is this one? What are its purposes?
This looks similar to the knot Chris Mendez proposed. It's hard to tell from the photo, but I don't think it's the same knot.
Jan
25
comment How to select a good GPS receiver?
I don't believe the claim that some handheld GPS units have smaller errors than others. Do you have any documentation for this claim?
Jan
25
revised Headlamp with open flame
spelling
Jan
21
comment Is there a technique to snow-shoeing besides “walk on the snow”?
@ShemSeger: Those aren't front-points. Front-points on crampons are the claws that stick out horizontally from your toes.
Jan
20
revised Is there a technique to snow-shoeing besides “walk on the snow”?
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Jan
20
answered Is there a technique to snow-shoeing besides “walk on the snow”?
Jan
20
comment Is there a technique to snow-shoeing besides “walk on the snow”?
+1, but poles are not necessary for snowshoeing.
Jan
14
comment Numbers on down jackets
@shimizu: There are EN ratings for sleeping bags, but as far as I know, there is no similar system for jackets. You could get a pretty good idea, though, by multiplying the fill power by the total weight. That would give you a measure of the jacket's volume.
Jan
13
comment Does cotton really kill?
For someone who's sensitive to lanolin, another option is alpaca.
Jan
9
comment Acclimatization strategies
@EverythingRightPlace: I was referring to the caption on the graph for Nanga Parbat in the House and Johnston book. That was in answer to your question in the final sentence of your first comment.
Jan
8
comment Quality/robustness of avalanche shovels
IMO it's a bit of a delusion, all of this business about taking avalanche courses and preparing for how to survive an avalanche with transceivers, shovels, etc. If someone is buried in an avalanche, they're likely to die. The snow partially melts from friction and then sets back up as hard as concrete. You can't dig a hole in it to get your buddy out. If you want to avoid dying in an avalanche, you need to practice avalanche avoidance, not avalanche safety.
Jan
6
comment How should I correctly use poles and other equipment to avoid back pain on long hikes?
I never understood the appeal of trekking poles until I started carrying 80+ lbs packs down into the bottom of the Grand Canyon for a living. This is a totally atypical example. For the vast majority of people, carrying 80 lbs would just be a silly mistake, and for them, poles are an impediment rather than an aid. The OP is asking about how to accommodate a specific back injury, which again is a very specific situation. Poles are not a general-purpose tool. They're highly specialized, and in most cases using them is just a matter of following a fad.
Jan
6
comment Why are backpack waist straps so long?
I always cut off the ends of the straps when I buy a pack.
Jan
5
comment Acclimatization strategies
@EverythingRightPlace: The caption says they had one period of bad weather on the Nanga Parbat climb. They also show other graphs of 8000 m peaks (Gasherbrum and Kanchenjunga), where they took somewhat less time to summit, about 30 days.
Jan
5
revised For how long afterwards do we benefit from acclimatization?
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Jan
5
revised For how long afterwards do we benefit from acclimatization?
added 1036 characters in body
Jan
5
revised Acclimatization strategies
added 73 characters in body