6,784 reputation
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bio website lightandmatter.com
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visits member for 1 year, 8 months
seen 15 hours ago

I live in LA and enjoy day hikes, backpacking, rock climbing, and mountaineering.


1d
comment What is the first thing to do, when buried in an avalanche?
Your focus is on the wrong thing. You should be focused on how not to be in an area where an avalanche is likely. This can be done by examining a topo map and checking how much recent snowfall there has been. Once you've been buried in an avalanche, your chances of survival are extremely poor no matter what you do.
2d
comment What equipment do I need as a beginner outdoor rock climber?
People typically only own one harness, one belay device, and one helmet, so they aren't going to be able to loan that stuff to a climbing partner.
Nov
25
comment Slings for anchoring and lanyard in rock climbing
The DMM links are really good, and surprised me about a lot of things. I didn't know that it was possible to break a knotted, shoulder-length sling with a fall-factor-1 fall equal to the length of the sling -- scary!
Nov
24
revised What equipment do I need as a beginner outdoor rock climber?
added 300 characters in body
Nov
24
answered What equipment do I need as a beginner outdoor rock climber?
Nov
18
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
17
comment Dog Breeds for Backpacking and Trail Running
@theJollySin: Usually it's thorns, which can be pulled out and the dog is good to go again. Broken glass can also be a worry, or just sharp rocks.
Nov
14
revised Please Explain Rock Climbing Grades
added 9 characters in body
Nov
14
comment Using the Yosemite Decimal System, how difficult is Everest?
related: outdoors.stackexchange.com/q/4674/2169
Nov
14
comment Using the Yosemite Decimal System, how difficult is Everest?
The article you linked to also says that the Hillary Step is class 4. Since YDS ratings are supposed to be defined by the most difficult part of the climb, I think the over-all answer is that the normal route on Everest is class 4.
Nov
10
comment What are the real dangers of climbing at high altitude?
There is a variety of conditions that can result from being at high altitude, through a bunch of different physiological mechanisms. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Altitude_sickness Two really bas ones are high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE). Re HAPE, which you asked about, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-altitude_pulmonary_edema
Nov
5
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
3
comment When should you carry a firearm when hiking/trekking?
@DJClayworth: And even that probably overstates the danger. I suspect that at least some of these people who got killed were doing something stupid such as taunting the bear.
Nov
3
comment When should you start to train with Campus Boards, Hang Boards and Peg Boards?
Climbing grades are amorphous things. Different people's ratings of the same climb could differ by as much as .5 on the YDS. Even if people agree on a grade, there are many different reasons that a particular climb could have a certain level of difficulty. Different types of climbs are qualitatively different.
Oct
31
revised How to achieve a climbing anchor that can withstand an upward load?
edited body
Oct
30
answered How to achieve a climbing anchor that can withstand an upward load?
Oct
30
comment Trail gun for protection against bears
No, for black bears a gun is not even an appropriate precaution.
Oct
30
comment When should you use gear to climb a tree?
I don't think fear is a reliable guide. People are often afraid of things that aren't significant dangers (mass shootings), and unafraid of things that are dangerous (tailgating on the freeway). Fear tends to go away with familiarity and repetition; danger doesn't. This is why people take avalanche courses and then go out and get killed by avalanches -- familiarity makes them think it's safe.
Oct
30
comment Mountaineering / glacial traverse: rope-up or go it alone?
I've heard that roping everyone together without having a fixed anchor is falling out of fashion Where did you hear this? It sounds pretty impractical to me. Fixed anchors are typically for near-vertical climbing such as YDS class 5. It takes a long time to set up and take down fixed belays.