Reputation
11,856
Next tag badge:
111/100 score
18/20 answers
Badges
32 71
Impact
~211k people reached

Aug
10
comment Pack of coyotes in my neighborhood
Typically the reason you'd see coyotes in a human-inhabited area is that they're coming there to scavenge food and find water. However, if you're seeing them repeatedly in the wooded lot across the road from you, then it's quite possible that they have a den there and are raising their pups. (It's August, which is getting toward the end of denning season.) If that's the case, then probably they will leave that area very soon, and you won't have as much interaction with them after that.
Aug
10
comment Pack of coyotes in my neighborhood
Nice answer. Two minor corrections. Usually coyotes are active at dawn and dusk, not so much at night. (And during denning season, which is spring and summer, they may be more active during the day.) Also, I seriously doubt that animal control or the police would do anything at all just because a coyote is around. At least where I live in LA, coyotes are about as common as squirrels.
Aug
9
comment Leave no Trace: Are campfires unethical?
+1, because I agree with the first paragraph and the rest is thought-provoking. But I can't help feeling that the author of the article on Conscious Impact Living is being silly and irrelevant. Of course the production of beef jerkey has an environmental impact and moral implications regarding factory farming, etc. But these issues are outside the scope of LNT. LNT isn't meant to be a grand unified philosophy of life, it's a specific approach for visiting wilderness areas without damaging them.
Aug
9
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
9
comment Leave no Trace: Are campfires unethical?
National parks do often have prohibitions on fires in specific areas, e.g., no fires above a certain altitude in a certain national park.
Aug
9
comment When is it unethical to dismantle a fire-ring?
A similar issue that I've run into is when people build very tall, very elaborate circular rock walls in scenic spots like the summit of a peak. IMO these can get out of proportion and spoil the natural beauty of the place, so sometimes I cut them down in height. People don't need to camp smack dab on top of the summit.
Aug
8
comment What is an equalette anchor?
@imsodin: Why does everyone need a separate tie in point? I didn't claim that every person needed a separate tie-in point. It's just messy and confusing when you have many different things tied in to one place. Using the method illustrated in the FOTH figure for multipitch, you'd have 6 lockers all clustered in the same area: two for the leader, two for the belay device, and two for the follower. But the text of FOTH does say you can also do what I would do, which is to use a single biner per tie-in, with a sliding x. To me the most natural application of the equalette seems like top-roping.
Aug
8
comment What is an equalette anchor?
@ShemSeger: I've always used lockers when I'm anchoring myself to the wall and setting up belay stations, I've only ever used wiregates for intermediate protection. I guess different people have different habits. I use a locker only where it's a single point of failure.
Aug
6
comment US vs central European bear advice
@DavidMulder: Fatalities are not the issue. Yosemite has only black bears. Black bears are not particularly dangerous. They are often no bigger than a German shepherd, and they almost never get aggressive with humans. The issue with black bears is that they're nuisance animals that try to get people's food. The purpose of all the precautions is to keep the bears from getting your food, which is good for you and also breaks the cycle of bears getting dependent on human food.
Aug
6
answered US vs central European bear advice
Aug
5
comment What safety precautions should I take on the Appalachian Trail?
The most common hazard in Connecticut would be unpleasant weather, either cold with rain and slush or hot with oppressive humidity. However, in September you stand at least some chance of hitting one of the four or five days a year on which the weather is pleasant.
Aug
5
comment What is an equalette anchor?
The FOTH example also seems heavy and over-engineered to me. It uses 5 lockers, when in fact you could just use three wiregates for the three pieces of pro, and (as you note in your answer) a single locker at the bottom.
Aug
5
comment What is an equalette anchor?
[...] second gets up, s/he is going to want to tie in. That makes a total of three tie-ins. With a cordelette, we accomplish that by using three locking carabiners, which can be distributed between the master point and the shelf. Looking at the equalette, I don't see how you do that without doing something really awkward. In general I just don't see the common application where the equalette is really what I need. On a sport climb, I'm usually pretty sure the two redundant bolts are plenty strong enough to hold my static weight. May be worth knowing when you have a trad anchor with bad pro.
Aug
5
comment What is an equalette anchor?
Nice answer. The FOTH figure illustrates what looks like an application to trad climbing, but I've also seen many sport climbers bring a pre-made equalette up with them on a sport climb, and they then just snap it to the bolts. I've never seen anyone actually use one for trad, and it seems like it would be a little awkward for that purpose, or maybe I'm not understanding some details about how it would be applied. Usually If I've just led a pitch, I want to tie myself in, and then I'm going to give my second a direct belay. This requires two tie-ins to my anchor. Once my [...]
Aug
5
comment What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
@mattkaeo: Maybe slightly less, because there are simply fewer big animals higher up.
Aug
5
revised What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
added 148 characters in body
Aug
5
answered What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
Aug
4
comment What's the best way to avoid slipping on ice?
Yaktrax totally suck. Microspikes are way better. As far as I can tell, the only situation where yaktrax might be better than microspikes is if you're going running in the winter.
Aug
4
comment Backpacking Through Rain
In addition to what others have said, bring lots of extra socks. Having wet feet is an instant recipe for blisters.
Aug
4
accepted Back-stepping versus a layback?