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Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
2
revised Guidelines for safe use of ATC Nano?
deleted 4 characters in body
Apr
2
comment Guidelines for safe use of ATC Nano?
Thanks, that's very helpful. But I'm having trouble locating 3 mm climbing ropes. Do you think dental floss works, or does the wax cut down the friction too much?
Apr
1
asked Guidelines for safe use of ATC Nano?
Apr
1
answered What's the best way to dispose of a body in the backcountry?
Apr
1
comment How to overcome fear of falling in lead climbing
Most of the question sounds like it's about gym climbing, but at the end it mentions slabs. I think the context matters here. Indoor sport climbing is extremely safe, and you really have to do something stupid in order to get hurt. But in various forms of outdoor climbing, falling can be much less of a safe, controlled thing.
Mar
28
awarded  Yearling
Mar
27
comment How do you build a campfire that leaves no trace?
Are you assuming you can obtain firewood without disturbing the environment, e.g., you're car camping and have brought in firewood in the car? If you're in the backcountry, then you're going to have to gather wood, and that's not going to be LNT.
Mar
26
revised How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
added 716 characters in body
Mar
26
comment How to calculate the force (kN) generated by a falling climber onto their protection?
The answer seems to suggest that the online calculator implements the analysis given in the WP article. Actually, reading the javascript source code of the calculator shows that it calculates S=(m/m0)fk, where they call S the "shock force," m is the mass of the climber, m0=80 kg, f is the fall factor, and k is 4.5 for a dynamic rope, 9 for a static rope. This is completely different from the WP result. In particular, it doesn't make sense in the case where f=0. This is the case where the rope is simply holding the climber's body weight, and in this case there is not zero tension in the rope.
Mar
25
comment Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
We had access to the top of the climb by scrambling up the back.
Mar
24
comment Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
I don't think the BMC video is really relevant here. The question is specifically about an autoblocking device and about lowering. The video shows a non-autoblocking device (looks like an ordinary ATC) and doesn't deal with lowering.
Mar
24
answered Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
Mar
24
revised Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
added 133 characters in body
Mar
24
revised Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
added 133 characters in body
Mar
24
comment Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
Thanks, that's all very helpful. In my case the reason for belaying from above was that the climb was too long for top-roping with a single rope. I see what you mean about the Munter. I guess the question would be what mode of failure the Munter is supposed to be guarding against. I'll edit the question in order to try to clarify this.
Mar
24
asked Lowering a climber from above using a belay device in autolocking mode
Mar
24
comment Using a synthetic sleeping bag on/under it's limit
You could just wear a lot of clothes to bed, including thick wool long underwear and a wool cap.
Mar
19
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
18
comment Camping with a tarp, what are risks about animals?
I've never camped in any place where there was any issue with small animals or snakes wanting to crawl into my sleeping bag or anything like that. Small-animal nuisances are usually about them wanting your food, and a tent doesn't help with that. Reptiles are normally not very active at night, and most are shy.