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Aug
12
comment Genuine leather or synthetic leather boots
If the issue is wet feet, then I don't think the issue is real leather versus synthetic, it's more like leather versus goretex (or some other waterproof, breathable material such as e-vent).
Aug
12
comment Backpacking with a dog
I don't have any specific info about dogs, so I'll just make this a comment, but -- 8,000 to 12,000 feet is not really high altitude, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. For comparison, the cabin in an airplane is equivalent to about 8000 feet, and nobody worries about acclimatization before getting on a plane. Acclimatization is a whole suite of physiological adaptations, almost all of which take many days or even a week or two to work completely, so when people talk about acclimatizing by spending one day at altitude or something, it's probably just a placebo.
Aug
12
answered Hiking: How to start?
Aug
12
revised Most common avoidable reasons for climbing accidents?
added 62 characters in body
Aug
12
comment Most common avoidable reasons for climbing accidents?
@nhinkle: Good info, thanks. I was structuring my answer around specific and avoidable things, rather than some of the broader categories that ANAM uses for their stats. It might be valuable if you could write an answer summarizing ANAM's stats, though.
Aug
12
asked Most common avoidable reasons for climbing accidents?
Aug
12
answered Most common avoidable reasons for climbing accidents?
Aug
12
comment Is Kamikaze knot safe with ropes of different diameters?
The fact that Bear Grylls advocates it tells me for sure that I don't want to do it.
Aug
11
comment Is Kamikaze knot safe with ropes of different diameters?
I don't understand the question. Isn't this a (dangerous) technique for rappelling on a single strand and then retrieving your rope? Doesn't that just involve a single rope? Why would there be two different diameters involved?
Aug
10
comment Pack of coyotes in my neighborhood
Typically the reason you'd see coyotes in a human-inhabited area is that they're coming there to scavenge food and find water. However, if you're seeing them repeatedly in the wooded lot across the road from you, then it's quite possible that they have a den there and are raising their pups. (It's August, which is getting toward the end of denning season.) If that's the case, then probably they will leave that area very soon, and you won't have as much interaction with them after that.
Aug
10
comment Pack of coyotes in my neighborhood
Nice answer. Two minor corrections. Usually coyotes are active at dawn and dusk, not so much at night. (And during denning season, which is spring and summer, they may be more active during the day.) Also, I seriously doubt that animal control or the police would do anything at all just because a coyote is around. At least where I live in LA, coyotes are about as common as squirrels.
Aug
9
comment Leave no Trace: Are campfires unethical?
+1, because I agree with the first paragraph and the rest is thought-provoking. But I can't help feeling that the author of the article on Conscious Impact Living is being silly and irrelevant. Of course the production of beef jerkey has an environmental impact and moral implications regarding factory farming, etc. But these issues are outside the scope of LNT. LNT isn't meant to be a grand unified philosophy of life, it's a specific approach for visiting wilderness areas without damaging them.
Aug
9
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
9
comment Leave no Trace: Are campfires unethical?
National parks do often have prohibitions on fires in specific areas, e.g., no fires above a certain altitude in a certain national park.
Aug
9
comment When is it unethical to dismantle a fire-ring?
A similar issue that I've run into is when people build very tall, very elaborate circular rock walls in scenic spots like the summit of a peak. IMO these can get out of proportion and spoil the natural beauty of the place, so sometimes I cut them down in height. People don't need to camp smack dab on top of the summit.
Aug
8
comment What is an equalette anchor?
@imsodin: Why does everyone need a separate tie in point? I didn't claim that every person needed a separate tie-in point. It's just messy and confusing when you have many different things tied in to one place. Using the method illustrated in the FOTH figure for multipitch, you'd have 6 lockers all clustered in the same area: two for the leader, two for the belay device, and two for the follower. But the text of FOTH does say you can also do what I would do, which is to use a single biner per tie-in, with a sliding x. To me the most natural application of the equalette seems like top-roping.
Aug
8
comment What is an equalette anchor?
@ShemSeger: I've always used lockers when I'm anchoring myself to the wall and setting up belay stations, I've only ever used wiregates for intermediate protection. I guess different people have different habits. I use a locker only where it's a single point of failure.
Aug
6
comment US vs central European bear advice
@DavidMulder: Fatalities are not the issue. Yosemite has only black bears. Black bears are not particularly dangerous. They are often no bigger than a German shepherd, and they almost never get aggressive with humans. The issue with black bears is that they're nuisance animals that try to get people's food. The purpose of all the precautions is to keep the bears from getting your food, which is good for you and also breaks the cycle of bears getting dependent on human food.
Aug
6
answered US vs central European bear advice
Aug
5
comment What safety precautions should I take on the Appalachian Trail?
The most common hazard in Connecticut would be unpleasant weather, either cold with rain and slush or hot with oppressive humidity. However, in September you stand at least some chance of hitting one of the four or five days a year on which the weather is pleasant.