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Aug
5
comment What is an equalette anchor?
Nice answer. The FOTH figure illustrates what looks like an application to trad climbing, but I've also seen many sport climbers bring a pre-made equalette up with them on a sport climb, and they then just snap it to the bolts. I've never seen anyone actually use one for trad, and it seems like it would be a little awkward for that purpose, or maybe I'm not understanding some details about how it would be applied. Usually If I've just led a pitch, I want to tie myself in, and then I'm going to give my second a direct belay. This requires two tie-ins to my anchor. Once my [...]
Aug
5
comment What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
@mattkaeo: Maybe slightly less, because there are simply fewer big animals higher up.
Aug
5
revised What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
added 148 characters in body
Aug
5
answered What are wildlife hazards/precautions near the treeline at 8200ft on Hearst Lake in Montana?
Aug
4
comment What's the best way to avoid slipping on ice?
Yaktrax totally suck. Microspikes are way better. As far as I can tell, the only situation where yaktrax might be better than microspikes is if you're going running in the winter.
Aug
4
comment Backpacking Through Rain
In addition to what others have said, bring lots of extra socks. Having wet feet is an instant recipe for blisters.
Aug
4
accepted Back-stepping versus a layback?
Aug
4
asked Back-stepping versus a layback?
Aug
2
awarded  equipment
Aug
1
comment Would tied strips of webbing have similar strength to a climbing rope?
I'm not trying to put you down or make you feel bad, but your question definitely shows a lack of knowledge and experience in roped climbing. Briefly, the reason why this will not work is that knots won't pass through a belay device. If you're going to go out climbing, please make sure you have someone more experienced and knowledgeable with you.
Jul
31
comment Protecting Food Supplies from wildlife animals While Backpacking
One good option is an ursack: ursack.com . It's a lightweight kevlar bag that is bear-proof and also fairly good against rodents. Hanging bags up in trees is an outdated technique that doesn't work well in areas that have bears habituated to obtaining human food.
Jul
31
revised Protecting Food Supplies from wildlife animals While Backpacking
fix typo in title
Jul
30
comment Should you occasionally use locking biners on pieces of protection when using alpine draws?
The video is really good -- convinced me to buy a few. I've seen the thing happen that he demonstrates where the rope slides the screw barrel out, and it's pretty horrifying.
Jul
30
comment Should you occasionally use locking biners on pieces of protection when using alpine draws?
Two pounds is a lot when it's hanging off of your harness or a gear sling.
Jul
30
comment How do I know what size ice axe I should get?
There is no single best length for an ax, even for a particular person. A long one is good for walking in cane position on a relatively low-angle slope. As the slope gets steeper and you start getting into something more like ice climbing, you want a shorter ax or technical ice tools. Lengths of axes don't really correlate much with the person's size. It's more about what activity you're going to be doing.
Jul
30
comment What clothing would be suitable for hiking and camping in 0°C?
Is the waterproof stuff because you think there's a chance of rain, or just for wind protection? In general, your proposed clothing layers sound all right to me for a front-country day hike, but since you're camping, they sound a little inadequate unless you're willing to huddle in your sleeping bag all evening and all morning. I would add a wool base layer (I have a smartwool one that I love) and a down jacket of some kind.
Jul
30
comment Should you occasionally use locking biners on pieces of protection when using alpine draws?
Also, I think the concern about non-rigid draws is overblown. Once the rope is through the carabiner, the rope itself prevents the draw from twisting. In a way, a non-rigid draw may be better, because you can choose which way to flip the bottom biner, positioning it so that the rope pulls against the spine. I'm not much of a sport climber, but I had imagined that the reason for the rigid quickdraws was that their rigidity would make them easy to place quickly.
Jul
30
answered Should you occasionally use locking biners on pieces of protection when using alpine draws?
Jul
30
comment Should you occasionally use locking biners on pieces of protection when using alpine draws?
A side issue: I'm not following what you're saying re wiregates versus non-wiregates. Are you saying that one is more likely to open than the other? Is there evidence for this?
Jul
29
accepted Avoiding a “ding-dong” when lead belaying in the gym?