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Nov
1
awarded  Nice Answer
Oct
31
asked What is a “sling belay?”
Oct
31
comment Climbing: fear/panic on boulder wall
It sounds like you just don't enjoy climbing unprotected, so why not switch to roped climbing instead?
Oct
29
comment Dealing With Wind Direction Changes When Sleeping In A Tarp
A tarp basically isn't intended as protection against the wind.
Oct
23
comment Should I run if I see wild dogs?
We tend to get a lot of discussion on outdoors.SE that's along the lines of "I'm scared of bears/dogs/snakes/spiders, so how can I kill them, scare them away, vaporize them with laser beams, (etc.) so they can't get me?" A wild/feral/abandoned dog is a sentient being that is trying to survive. Obviously I don't want to get killed by a pack of them, but realistically, a dog's prey is stuff like rabbits and squirrels. Although it's been known to happen that wild dogs kill humans, it's not common. A good outcome is one in which both dogs and humans are OK.
Oct
21
comment Should I run if I see wild dogs?
I'd go for a thrown rock or a sturdy stick. I've seen even an aggressive dog shy off when I waved a stick at it.
Oct
20
comment Case example on Altitude Mountain Sickness: How to detect and react properly?
Could you please state the reference to the sleep disorder not being part of AMS See this answer outdoors.stackexchange.com/a/9653/2169 . If your Lake Louise score was about 3-4, then you probably had mild to moderate AMS.
Oct
20
comment Case example on Altitude Mountain Sickness: How to detect and react properly?
Normally AMS symptoms take time - up to 24 or even 48 hours to develop. The OP describes being in the mountains at elevation for quite a long time, clearly many days.
Oct
19
comment Case example on Altitude Mountain Sickness: How to detect and react properly?
It seems obvious that you had an altitude illness. The question is how severe it was, and whether it was AMS, HAPE, or HACE. Did you have ataxia? Did you have rales? Were you able to catch your breath when resting, and speak in complete sentences? What do you get if you score yourself on the Lake Louise questionnaire? Recent work shows that sleep disorder is not a symptom of AMS.
Oct
18
comment How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
I don't know, maybe we're just differing in emphasis or how conservative we are. I intentionally phrased the question to be very limited in scope: about diagnosis only, not prevention, treatment, or decision-making.
Oct
18
comment How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
If you have sources in German, why not just reference them? If they're online, people can always use Google Translate. BTW, your answer prompted me to learn about the Lake Louise questionnaire. There actually seems to be a consensus that has developed within the last couple of years that it is not very good and needs to be redesigned. I put some info about that in my own answer.
Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
comment How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
@mattnz: I found a study by Dallimore that measured the background rate of AMS symptoms. I've added a brief discussion of this to my answer and a link to the paper's abstract. (The body of the paper is paywalled.) Since the background rate is quite high (about 10%), it seems likely to me that what you experienced at 2000 m was not actually AMS.
Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
revised How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
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Oct
18
comment How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
BTW, there is some obviously wrong material in the Heller article. "If you are traveling above 9,840 feet (3,000 meters), you should carry enough oxygen for several days." This was clearly written by someone who has no first-hand knowledge.
Oct
18
comment How do you diagnose severe altitude illness?
Assume acute mountain sickness (AMS) unless proven otherwise. This is not supported by the Heller article. AMS is potentially life threatening, so if you have symptoms related to AMS, do not ascend any further. I'm not clear on what you mean here. Do you mean any symptoms? E.g., one of the symptoms you list is fatigue, which is a perfectly normal way to feel when climbing a mountain. A more realistic suggestion might be not to climb higher if you have early symptoms in severe form, multiple symptoms, advanced symptoms, or more than a certain score on the Lake Louise questionnaire.