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Sep
14
revised What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
added 61 characters in body
Sep
14
comment What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
@ChrisMendez: Personally, I always do the knot in advance. However, many outdoor sport climbers don't seem to do it. I do it in the gym as well, and I've even have people act surprised, as if I was doing something wrong.
Sep
14
revised What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
added 189 characters in body
Sep
13
comment What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
@gauteh: I like the idea in the first sentence of your comment. But I'm confused by the second sentence. Are you talking about putting the rope directly through the bolt? Even if it would fit, wouldn't that tend to cause the rope to be severed by the bolt if you fell hard on it?
Sep
13
answered What to do when you run out of rope on a sports climb?
Sep
10
comment Finding a suitable slope to practice self arrest?
A belay is totally unnecessary for this. All you need is a safe runout.
Sep
8
answered How do you get into a prone position without catching your crampons?
Sep
8
comment How do you get into a prone position without catching your crampons?
Liam, could you clarify the question? The basic answer, as stated in Phab's answer, is to bend your knees. This assumes you're already face down. If you start out face up, then the front points of your crampons are up in the air, so you don't have a problem. Could you describe for us in more detail what particular situation you have in mind? There are basically four positions you can fall in: on your back head uphill, on your back head down, face down and head up hill, or face down and head downhill. Is it one of these specifically you're concerned about?
Sep
5
comment What's this knot called?
Even with the offset figure-8, which has been implicated in several rappelling accidents, you can't get it to roll if it's been carefully dressed and pretensioned. In the lab tests where they made that knot roll, they had to intentionally tie it loosely. In the lab tests where they tried to get the (dry) EDK to roll, they failed even when they intentionally tied it loosely.
Sep
5
comment What's this knot called?
BTW, in the first video, where the offset 8 fails, the mode of failure isn't rolling. When a knot fails by rolling, the tails get eaten up. In the video, it's clear that there is still plenty of tail left when the knot fails. The rope broke, probably right below the knot, where you can see the exposed white core immediately before the failure. This should also help to make it clear that the tensions in these experiments are much greater than you could ever get while rappelling.
Sep
5
comment What's this knot called?
@ShemSeger: Your first link shows an offset figure-8, not an offset overhand. Yes, the second one is an offset overhand in a rope that has been soaked in water. Any knot can fail if the rope is made sufficiently slippery. Lab tests have never succeeded in getting an EDK to roll (capsize) under normal conditions: user.xmission.com/~tmoyer/testing/EDK.html . Since you presumably haven't done lab tests on your knot when it was wet and subjected to thousands of pounds of tension, I don't know how you can conclude that it is any more secure than an EDK when the rope is slippery.
Sep
5
comment What's this knot called?
which significantly reduces the knots ability to slip. The EDK doesn't slip.
Sep
1
comment How to introduce individuals to the concept of Leave No Trace
The biggest barrier I run into when talking to people about this is that they want to bury their toilet paper. They don't want to believe that it's not biodegradable. They don't want to pack it out. They pretend that burning it is sufficient, when in reality burning always fails to get some of the paper. They don't want to use wipes such as rocks -- which in my experience are just as comfortable as paper, but people don't believe that and aren't willing to try it.
Sep
1
comment Inexpensive ways to learn cross-country skiing
Have you done any skiing before, such as downhill skiing? Cross-country skiing is not really that difficult to learn, especially if you're not on steep terrain and the conditions are easy (e.g., not icy). You could probably teach yourself by watching youtube videos and just going out and trying it. Or find someone who can go out with you once and help you figure it out.
Sep
1
comment Inexpensive ways to learn cross-country skiing
I also disagree that there's anything wrong with going cross-country skiing alone. It's a decision to be made by the individual based on their skills, evaluation of the environment, etc.
Sep
1
comment Inexpensive ways to learn cross-country skiing
Avalanche training is not that relevant if you're not in terrain that can have avalanches. AFAIK Montreal is not mountainous...? Even if you are in an area that has mountains, it is not always necessary to have formal avalanche safety training if you want to go cross-country skiing. For example, if you're going to an area that has groomed trails, you could just check with the owners or check their website for conditions.
Aug
27
revised One-sided overhand bend
delete incorrect assumption from question
Aug
27
comment One-sided overhand bend
Since 3 out of 3 answers agree that it is not unsafe, I'm going to change the question so that it doesn't claim it's unsafe and then ask why. We would not want casual readers to see this and get incorrect safety information.
Aug
27
answered One-sided overhand bend
Aug
27
comment One-sided overhand bend
This answer seems OK except that I wouldn't talk about whether a knot is stronger or weaker than another knot. This reinforces a common misconception about knots, as explained in my answer. The EDK will hold until the rope breaks, as will various other bends.