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4h
comment Carrying soda instead of water due to nutritional energy?
Sodas have more calories than water but these are empty calories providing short bursts of energy, while also straining your body with artificial sweeteners and other compounds to digest This basically sounds like pop culture or pseudoscience to me. A sweetened soda does not strain your body to digest. In fact, the opposite is true -- sugars like fructose are extremely easy to digest rapidly.
4h
comment Carrying soda instead of water due to nutritional energy?
@Aravona: no protein, no vitamins I assume the question refers to a day hike, since you obviously aren't going to carry enough soda for all your drinking needs for a longer trip. On a day hike, there is no reason that you need to consume protein or vitamins. Consuming nothing but carbs for a full day is perfectly OK and will do you no harm. Only on a longer trip (maybe a week or more) do you really need to start worrying about the balance of macronutrients, or about micronutrients.
May
1
comment What water is fit for cleaning hands & gear during a visit to the Great Outdoors?
The quoted material says "use purified drinking-quality water," as if purification is synonymous with potability. In many pristine backcountry areas, purification is not required for potability.
Apr
23
comment Are climbing harnesses tested for upside down falls?
I've been told that if you fall upside-down, you should spread your legs to make it impossible to fall out of the harness, but I never had much confidence that I would have that much presence of mind. This probably depends a lot on the individual's body shape.
Apr
16
comment Whippet as trekking pole?
I don't understand the question. You say, "Question arises from hiking on steep hills (no snow, dry grass)," and "I've red that most people offer to use ice axes in this kind of situation[...]" I must be missing something here. People use ice axes in snow...?
Apr
15
comment Most common infectious diseases acquired in the wilderness?
@CareyGregory: Water purification is not necessary in pristine backcountry areas in North America. The belief that people get wilderness-acquired diarrhea from drinking untreated water, in these environments, is contradicted by modern scientific evidence. The evidence is that wilderness-acquired diarrhea, in these areas, comes from hand-to-mouth contamination.
Apr
12
comment Possible diet to avoid/delay defecation
I assume this is a joke. If so, then congrats on what appears to have been a very successful troll.
Apr
11
comment How dependable is a cheap compass?
In the photo, part of what's going on could actually be the compasses interacting magnetically with one another. The south pole of each compass is attracted to the north pole of all the other compasses, and and the north to the south. Furthermore, they will be affected by any nearby magnetic materials. For instance, the photographer may have put them on top of an iron box or something. And finally, some of them may be stuck in place. For example, they may stick if not held in a horizontal position, and the photographer may have tilted them for the photo shoot.
Apr
9
comment Most common infectious diseases acquired in the wilderness?
@Erik: Good point, but I would be happy with any data from anywhere.
Apr
8
comment How do you avoid Norovirus on the AT?
@JamesJenkins: Yes, they're different kinds of organisms. I don't think it's true that it's much easier to get norovirus. Giardia is present in about 3-7% of adults in the US. That high rate of incidence suggests that it is extremely easy to get (although most people who have it are asymptomatic).
Apr
8
comment How do you avoid Norovirus on the AT?
Note that the way norovirus is likely to be transmitted is the same as the way you are most likely to get other bugs such as giardia, i.e., person-to-person transmission from people who have bad potty hygiene. (Getting giardia from untreated water in pristine wilderness areas is largely a myth.) So take the same generic set of precautions for all of these bugs. Wash your hands, and don't share utensils.
Apr
5
comment Is it polite to ask other climbers to belay for you?
Indoors, I would definitely consider it normal and OK to ask, but you do have to be more careful about trusting yourself to an incompetent belayer. Outdoors, I think it's complicated and depends on the situation. A pretty common situation outdoors is that group A and group B have set up topropes next to each other, and they take turns climbing on each other's ropes. Often if you just hang out and watch someone climbing a route, you don't have to ask -- they will offer to belay you.
Apr
5
comment How to inspect climbing bolts?
Besides the good ideas in this answer, you can also get information about the bolts in a particular area by reading guidebooks or looking at online info from mountainproject or summitpost. There are also certain sizes and types of bolts that are suspect, and you can get info about these from John Long's book on climbing anchors.
Apr
4
comment Online instructional videos for crack climbing
Oops, so this was a total duplicate of this: outdoors.stackexchange.com/questions/5299/…
Apr
3
comment Online instructional videos for crack climbing
related: outdoors.stackexchange.com/questions/11385/…
Apr
3
comment Online instructional videos for crack climbing
Since I accepted a good answer for crack, I'm going to start a new, separate question for slab technique. I'll edit this question so that it no longer refers to slab.
Apr
3
comment Quickest / most efficient way to ascend a hanging rope with rock climbing gear?
For most trad climbing, what would be most typical to bring along would just be a couple of Prusiks. Ascending a rope with those isn't super efficient, but they're light and compact. AFAIK mechanical ascenders would be more common for mountaineering routes where you're using a fixed line for hours (e.g., Everest), or maybe for certain activities on big wall or aid climbing. I think it's going to be hard to answer your question unless you specify what tools you have in mind.
Apr
2
comment Why static rope rather than webbing for toprope anchors?
Looking through the textbook for the course, there is a chapter on fixed lines. In addition to the application mentioned by the instructor, that may be another reason to own a static rope.
Apr
2
comment What range should I expect for a reasonable set of walkie-talkies / two-way radio?
Long range is not necessarily good. Sometimes when I'm in the mountains I pick up signals from people very far away (I'm guessing 20-30 miles, since some of them seem to be driving on a freeway, and that's how far it is to a freeway). This is a bad thing, because all those people are constantly squawking and cussing on the channel.
Apr
1
comment Why static rope rather than webbing for toprope anchors?
Re cost, REI has 1" webbing for $1.48/meter, and 11 mm static rope for $2.93/meter, so it's basically a factor of two in price. Many people consider any knot in tape to be a bit suspect. I don't really get this. The only knot I ever need to tie in webbing is a water knot, and there's nothing wrong with a water knot. Maybe it's harder to untie than some of the bends you could use with rope.