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Jul
1
comment Trekking in the Alps with a toddler - should we stay in refuges or backpack?
@Wills If I interpret it correctly, it is an agreement between different alpine clubs give the members of a foreign club the same conditions as their own ones. E.g. if the German Alpine Club (DAV) has such an agreement with the Swiss Alpine Club (SAC), then a DAV member pays the same reduced fee as a SAC member for a stay at a hut run by the SAC and vice versa.
Jun
30
comment Trekking in the Alps with a toddler - should we stay in refuges or backpack?
I'm not sure if planning to dispose your diapers at the huts is such a good idea. It depends a bit on how high up the mountain the huts are you're heading for, but supplying alpine huts can be anything from driving up all the food and down all the waste by off-road vehicles up to flying everything by helicopter. Either way, their waste management is typically rather limited and visitors are expected to not leave the waste they bring but carry it out themselves. So you might be frowned upon if you handle over the guys there some smelly used diapers for disposal.
Jun
29
comment Opening a beer bottle using a mountaineering ice ax
... the environment. I know lots of people who like to take a beer or two on easier hikes (nothing that involves climbing or serious risk) who cary out their empty bottles and dispose them at home.
Jun
29
comment Opening a beer bottle using a mountaineering ice ax
@ShemSeger This seems to be also a matter of culture. From my European perspective it looks like in a wast part of Nothern America (caution, my knowledge in this point is mainly from movies) it is considered macho to get out into the woods with some pals, some guns and lots of beer, get drunk, shoot at everything that moves, leave all your waste, and call it "go hunting". I don't know such behaviour to such extent in European countries and people that really get outdoors (i.e. not just some 100 meters into the forrest at the city border) have quite a sense of responsibility concerning...
Jun
25
comment Selecting a rotary hammer for bolting climbs
@ShemSeger Well, if you read carefully, I didn't explicitly recommend a minimum of 24V but I stated that the type of tool you are looking for typically just has 24V+ batteries, which doesn't mean that there isn't the one or another with lower voltage that does the job as well. In addition, weight is ambivalent in this context. You want your machine as light as possible since you have to haul it up that mountain, but since you will drill holes in spots where you can't push the drill against the wall you also want to have it to have some inertia to help with the drilling.
Jun
15
comment Bolt Conditions at the New River Gorge
Although this text contains good general advice, it does not really answer the question which was about how the bolt conditions are in New River Gorge and if there are spots to avoid.
Jun
10
comment What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
@Liam See comment above
Jun
10
comment What is the difference between “dry rope”, “non-dry rope” and “dry core rope”?
@ShemSeger You're basically right. Although I did never recommend to climb on on a wet rope but only mentioned rappelling I did some edit to clarify on this.
Jun
9
comment Drinking alcohol as the last choice in survival situation
Since water evaporates at higher temperatures than alcohol, the alcohol will drip out of the hose and the water will remain in the bottle – in theory. However, it will be hard to do this move even in a laboratory and I'm nearly sure it will work in the outdoors by just leaving the apparatus in the sun.
Jun
7
comment Is a smartphone or dedicated gps receiver better for navigation in the desert?
Somehow related: outdoors.stackexchange.com/questions/1260/…
Jun
7
comment How do I protect my book(s) while backpacking?
@ZachL Well, they might in the long run, but quite surely not over the time of a camping trip.
Jun
3
comment How to grade a trek?
Are you somehow affiliated with the website you link to (from looking at the team page I get the impression you are)? If yes, the stackexchange rules state that you should disclose that in a clear and obvious manner. Otherwise your answer is likely to be deleted as promotional spam. Even if you are not affiliated, it would be nice to learn why all travel agencies should follow the grading proposal of one such agency when grading their treks.
May
29
comment Is wild garlic edible? How do you prepare it?
Wikipedia says there is a whole bunch of plants known as wild garlic. Is it possible to narrow your question down a bit to one or two of them?
May
21
comment Where can I get long but light bottoms for water?
Already looked into running tights? They are of quite similar material and available in various thicknesses and lengths. You could take one that goes just beyond the knee and as you don't need all that fancy stuff like windstopper, fairly cheap ones should be sufficient.
Apr
29
comment Is it safe to wear a down jacket while building a fire
Fleece is not that good. I have some burn holes in my fleece jacket from lighting my barbecue...
Apr
2
comment Cleaning the sipper pipe of a hydration pack
What's wrong with the cotton-wire solution?
Apr
1
comment Climbing gear: can the energy absorbers of a lanyard for via ferratas be used only once?
In normal climbing the fall energy is nearly exclusively absorbed by the rope and technically falls cannot exceed a factor 2 fall and the force on the anchor is limited by the rope. In this setup the reusable absorber is thought to reduce the peak impact acting on a delicate anchor by taking a small portion of the energy. If the absorber maxes out, the rest can be taken by the rope. In via ferrata fall factors can be much higher and the whole energy has to be taken by the absorber. If the absorber maxes out here, the remaining energy directly hits the body and can cause serious injury.
Apr
1
comment Climbing gear: can the energy absorbers of a lanyard for via ferratas be used only once?
Good answer, but according to the website the reusable absorber is intended to be used in the safety chain of normal climbing protection to prevent overloading delicate anchors. I'm not sure if it is suitable for via ferrata use as well.
Mar
5
comment Most efficient training before alpine hiking/climbing?
True, but I was seeing this primarily from a cardiovascular point of view and not so much from the strength training perspective.
Mar
3
comment Stronger bond between GoPro mount and helmet?
You might want to concern that making the bond stronger might not be what you want. The camera on its mount is a thing sticking away from your head that makes a nice but hazardous lever to act on your head in case of a fall. There are already voices that suspect that helmet mounted cameras could lead to an increased injure rate for that reason. So having the connection between helmet and camera as the weakest breaking point in the system might be in your favour to protect your neck from damage.