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location Peak District, UK
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visits member for 4 months
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I live in a small village in the Peak District National Park in the UK. I'm an active caver, member of the local cave rescue team and also do a lot of hill walking. I also rock climb and do some mountaineering but mainly I'm caving.


2d
answered In an abandoned quarry, is it possible to pry loose rocks from walls until stable?
Jul
22
comment Can I use a bicycle helmet as a climbing helmet?
It isn't that rare to hit your head against something when climbing: there's always the ground! There have been many incidents where climbers have fallen relatively short distances from near the bottom of a crag onto the ground and have either suffered head injuries (not wearing a helmet) or been saved from suffering head injury (wearing a helmet). In the UK at least, Paramedics treat any fall involving the head striking the ground from a height of just 2 metres or more as possible cause of a head injury.
Jul
17
answered What should a rescue team be equipped with?
Jul
17
answered Pitching a tent in the rain?
Jul
3
answered Best lightweight pole for tarp
Jun
25
accepted Can a nylon tent flysheet which is delaminating be repaired?
Jun
24
asked Can a nylon tent flysheet which is delaminating be repaired?
Jun
24
answered What is this knee pain when going downhill?
Jun
14
answered Do polarized sunglasses protect against UV?
Jun
14
comment Cutting snow steps on slopes
Step cutting certainly is not obsolete. Yes, crampons would be worn where necessary on hard snow or ice but if you meet a short, steep section of hard snow where you could not simply kick your boots into the snow, then it would be a waste of time stopping to put on crampons, ascend the slope, and then stop again to remove crampons. A few steps quickly cut with an ice axe would speed things up greatly.
Jun
12
awarded  Commentator
Jun
12
comment What is SPF in sunscreen cream?
You can always cover up with appropriate clothing as well as apply sun screen.
Jun
10
revised what boots are good for caving?
Added Caving tag
Jun
10
suggested suggested edit on what boots are good for caving?
Jun
9
answered Rules for Carrying flammable subtances in UK
Jun
5
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
5
comment What temperatures can I expect in caves compared to surface?
We can agree to disagree on the rate at which temperature increases with depth. However, the point is that for a given depth underground, the temperature is fairly constant irrespective of changes at the surface and for the majority of caves, which are not that deep after all, it will be pretty near to the local average temperature give or take a few degrees. This is more in line with the original question.
Jun
4
comment What temperatures can I expect in caves compared to surface?
The only place underground I have experienced warmer temperatures at depth was in a Potash mine which was 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) deep. At that depth the temperature was 45 C/113 F. But that was because of local geology, not because of the depth (1,400 metres is extremely small in relation to the thickness of the earth's crust). Krubera Cave (also known as Voronya Cave), in Abkhazia, Georgia is the deepest known cave in the world at present at over 2000 metres/6561 feet but the cave is very cold, with temperatures of 1.0 C at 100 metres depth, rising slowly up to 7.2 C at 2000 m depth.
Jun
4
answered Tent placement?
Jun
4
answered What temperatures can I expect in caves compared to surface?