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1d
comment Is it offensive to “just hike” on a pilgrim's path?
@Lan Yes, it would.
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comment Is it offensive to “just hike” on a pilgrim's path?
That page also states that 0.21% of 200 pilgrims were motivated by a personal challenge. That would be less than 0.5 pilgrims, so there's something odd with the survey.
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comment Is it offensive to “just hike” on a pilgrim's path?
I feel a bit sorry for people who seek peace and solitude and then choose one of the most popular long distance routes around. I wonder if people expect peace and solitude on Tour the Mont Blanc (Alps) and Kungsleden (Sweden) as well. On the other hand, all are excellent choices for those looking for a social experience.
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comment Does a pound on your foot equal 5 pounds on your back?
@Tullochgorum When I'm navigating swamps, boulder fields, or bushwhacking, my speed is (quite a bit) less than 4 km/h, which again suggests that what may be true on a trail might not apply in rough wilderness country. Based on my own experience, I certainly agree that running in boots is a pain (except on a good trail descending). So I'd like to see some evidence where the same experiment is performed not on a flat treadmill at 4–8 km/h, but in (a realistic simulation of) trailless backcountry in terrain like the mountains of Scandinavia or Alaska where 2–4 km/h is more realistic.
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comment Does a pound on your foot equal 5 pounds on your back?
@Tullochgorum Perhaps I should try, although even the Vivobarefoot brand you mention has everything from thisor this to this “lightweight heavyweight”. I've never had injuries in my high boots but I concede it's a pain when they get wet. A closer look at the 1984 study says The energy cost of wearing boots was significantly higher at all speeds except the lowest (4 km/h)..
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comment Does a pound on your foot equal 5 pounds on your back?
@Tullochgorum Let's agree on the final point: a wider range of options (a good thing). Trail shoes may be suitable for trails, and some may choose to wear them on rougher terrain. I haven't seen them in rougher areas of Scandinavia like Sarek. I wonder if people wear them on trailless wilderness routes in areas like Kluane/Wrangell, Tweedsmuir, or in the Brooks Range...
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comment Is it offensive to “just hike” on a pilgrim's path?
I'm quite sure that it isn't a problem at all.
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comment Why do so many people hike with such light footwear?
@mattnz Those questions and answers only cover specific aspects and do not answer the focussed question I asked here. It is not a duplicate. See also the discussion in chat.
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comment Does a pound on your foot equal 5 pounds on your back?
I wouldn't want to isolate myself from the ground again, by that reasoning you might as well walk barefeet, and indeed, some people do.
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revised Why do so many people hike with such light footwear?
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Apr
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27
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Apr
27
comment wilderness maps
@Mark Thank you for this caveat. Also, being 8 km from several major interstate highways in open terrain is quite different than being 2 km from an inaccessible 4WD road with some major obstacles in-between.
Apr
27
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Apr
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Apr
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comment How can I tell a “trail shoe” from a regular sport shoe?
I have hiking shoes, my post/posts were mostly the surprise to see many people on hiking trails do not; and to me their shoes looked like regular sport shoes, but many probably were closer to trail shoes, but not hiking boots. I thought, either they're all irresponsible, or I'm missing something. I'm quite happy with my hiking boots, but apparently some say that trail shoes are superior even for heavy hiking.
Apr
26
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