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bio website topjaklont.org
location Toronto, Canada
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
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I'm a Post-Doctoral Fellow in atmospheric remote sensing at the University of Toronto in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. I first came to Stack Exchange for practical reasons: Tex.SE has been of major help when I wrote my licentiate (midterm) thesis. Since then, I have discovered the joy of many websites. As my network profile will show, I'm interested in travel, outdoor, scientific skepticism, and as I work in academia, also in academia and LaTeX.


1d
revised Driving tent pegs into rocky ground
edited body
Mar
18
awarded  Nice Question
Feb
27
comment Shoulder season backpacking near Whistler (early June)
Sure, I don't expect to be alone so close to Vancouver, I just meant that if there is one trail that is super-spectacular with 90% of the crowd, and another trail that is slightly less spectacular with 10% of the crowd, I tend to go for the latter.
Feb
26
asked Shoulder season backpacking near Whistler (early June)
Feb
22
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
12
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
10
comment Cycling in Ontario — do I need to worry about permission to access logging roads?
Would you know if there is an easy way to find out access rights before getting there? If a certain 30 km stretch of logging road has unambiguous signs prohibiting entry to all, a detour might be 200 km, which is not optimal if I have a train to catch. I'd need to find out who owns the road.
Feb
10
comment Cycling in Ontario — do I need to worry about permission to access logging roads?
It's not really cycling specific, is it? I would assume it is the same for any non-motorised traffic access. I actually started writing it on Travel.SE first. It fits on all three of those. Let's see if I get answers here. If not, I might flag for migration.
Feb
10
asked Cycling in Ontario — do I need to worry about permission to access logging roads?
Feb
3
comment How to stay hydrated with minimum water usage
@Wills Warm air contains a lot more water than cold air. 100% RH at -20°C is 6.4 * 10^-4 g/m³. 100% RH at +20°C is 1.5 * 10^-2 g/m³ — around 20x times more. That's why you can see your breath when it's cold outside, even if it's try — the humidity is too much for the air to contain.
Jan
21
revised Avoiding 4WD-areas in Iceland
added 329 characters in body
Jan
21
asked Avoiding 4WD-areas in Iceland
Jan
14
revised How much water should be carried while hiking in the desert?
SI units
Jan
14
revised How much water should be carried while hiking in the desert?
SI units
Jan
14
comment How to stay hydrated with minimum water usage
@OlinLathrop True that. I've recently spent a week in a desert for the first time (ironically with cloudy, windy, 5°C drizzle, in the Chihuahuan desert) but I don't understand how backpacking trips are possible — carrying 20 litre of water per person for a 4 day trip?!
Jan
14
revised If the Dawn Wall's been climbed before why is the current attempt so difficult?
spelling
Jan
14
comment How to stay hydrated with minimum water usage
100% humidity is not rare at all in winter, but 100% humidity in winter is still quite dry. Any time you're walking through fog you're walking through 100% humidity.
Jan
14
comment How to stay hydrated with minimum water usage
I've done 10-hour hikes through rainy weather at 5°C where I didn't drink more than 1 litre. But during those hikes I passed by potable water probably 6 times per hour, so I never had to worry about running out of water.
Jan
12
comment From an outdoor recreation point of view, does it matter who manages a national monument?
As for preservation and native people; I know that in Canada they established National park and preserve for a protected area where aboriginal people retain grandfathered "natural" rights. But that's relatively recent, and I don't know if the USA has something equivalent (would be a different question and maybe not a great fit on Outdoors.SE).
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Question