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seen Dec 10 '13 at 23:50

Just another software engineer. Longtime outdoor sports enthauist. Avid rock climber.


Jan
30
comment Rappelling in the Rain
@Mr.Wizard - I can't find any recommendations in climbing literature that you would need to change your rappel setup if the rope is wet, and that also isn't my personal experience. I have seen stray comments that the friction of a rope may change, but nothing that recommends that an individual rappeling down a dynamic rope would need to change behavior. Is there a reference I should read?
Jan
30
revised Rappelling in the Rain
added 452 characters in body
Jan
30
comment Rappelling in the Rain
oh, gotcha. I'll edit to reflict the fact that rope frictions will vary. Also, I climb with a 9.8mm rope or larger, and have rapped in the rain with a pair of half ropes... but I should edit my answer to reflict this. i was trying to keep my answer shorter, I'll make the edit tomorrow.
Jan
30
comment Rappelling in the Rain
You could test it yourself, if you're worried. Do you have any place you could rig off a low tree branch, or under a patio? You could rig a wet rope 8' off the ground, and see if its harder to just hold yourself right off the ground. :)
Jan
30
comment Rappelling in the Rain
New ropes are a little slicker, but I can't say I've noticed it affecting belaying or rappelling... I've never actually gotten rained on in the first month or so of a new rope... do you rappel with an "autoblock"? If you did, you could just put one or two extra wraps on your autoblock, and get more friction that way. Also, if you use a product like an ATC Guide or a Reverso3, you could put the device in "high friction mode" for rappelling, if you were worried about friction. At least, that's what I do.
Jan
30
revised Rappelling in the Rain
added 44 characters in body
Jan
30
answered Rappelling in the Rain
Jan
29
awarded  Organizer
Jan
29
revised What is a typical elongation of a dynamic climbing rope?
edited tags
Jan
29
comment What is a typical elongation of a dynamic climbing rope?
Agreed, this is a question about gear for an outdoor activity, which this Stack Exchange answers all the time. The elongation is one of the basic metrics of a climbing rope, like the temperature rating of a sleeping bag.
Jan
27
revised For what it's worth: climbing-tape
clarification of point
Jan
27
answered For what it's worth: climbing-tape
Jan
26
comment For what it's worth: climbing-tape
I've always just used tape marketed towards climbers (Metolius) and reused the gloves, applying more tape as needed. Gloves last me almost a while season in this fashion, so I don't worry about price too much. Other athletic tapes don't always work as well, for some reason, but there may be exceptions. FWIW, I don't think this SE is a great place to discuss prices , but opinions may vary. $4 isn't totally unreasonable, IMHO
Jan
24
comment Walking trailers
That seems like it would be incredibly awkward to manage, and could pull you backwards / sideways if you tried to navigate basic roots or stone steps on a trail. If option #1 isn't sufficient to let you meet your backpacking goals, could you do more training hikes and cardio to build up to your trip? Or try more comfortable backpacks?
Jan
24
comment How do I mount a hangboard in an apartment?
Painful in a good way? :)
Jan
22
comment What's the best protection for my knees while bouldering?
sure, that makes sense. I just wanted to make sure that my answer (wear something that covers your knees) applied. :)
Jan
22
comment What's the best protection for my knees while bouldering?
question - you're just getting scrapes on your knees, right? You aren't feeling orthopedic knee pain from twisting your knee the wrong way, or landing badly, right?
Jan
22
answered What's the best protection for my knees while bouldering?
Jan
16
answered Safest months to hike in Colorado
Jan
16
comment Safest months to hike in Colorado
Just a quick comment - the summer storms in the mountains in Colorado are usually pretty predictable - they hit in early afternoon on most days, and don't last more than an hour or so. It's not too too hard to be back in the valley or below the tree line before they hit. That can't be said of, say, avalanches, rhime ice, frostbite, white outs, or the other hazards that go along with the winter. :)