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Just another software engineer. Longtime outdoor sports enthauist. Avid rock climber.


Dec
13
answered Trail maintenance: what is considered inappropriate when maintaining a trail?
Dec
13
comment Trail maintenance: what is considered inappropriate when maintaining a trail?
+1 for "avoid looking too hard". Park services have strange and sometimes conficting priorities (balancing needs of hikers with nature conservancy / biodiversity, for instance, or balancing the needs of regular hikers with rock climbers). If one person starts making large, impactful changes on a trail on his own (setting up cairns, sawing off branches that have fallen in the trail) it could aggrevate existing tensions in the park
Dec
9
comment How can rope/cordage be packed to minimize tangles?
+1 - I use a butterfly coil for my 60m (200') climbing ropes, and rarely have significant tangles.
Dec
9
comment What can I do to prevent altitude sickness?
Both sides here have valid points: diamox isn't magic, and doesn't replace proper acclimation. But it can play a positive medical role (doesn't just hide symptoms). I've been on 4 trips above 10k feet, and for 2 of those I had a prescription for diamox, and generally felt better than the times I didn't have it. But there are side effects, and you should talk with your doctor first.
Dec
9
comment What can I do to prevent altitude sickness?
"Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hils" recommends diamox (acetazolamide) quote : "Acetazolamide doea appear to be effective in preventing and treating [acute mountain sickness] as well as irregular breathing brought on by high altitude" (7th edition, pg 490). There are side effects, and you should talk with a doctor, but the medicine is presented as treating and preventing altitude sickness. The book does NOT recommend diamox as a substitute for proper acclimatization, but as a supplement that may help some people.
Dec
7
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
FWIW, I like this one: rei.com/product/478026/power-putty-hand-strengthener I find the putty lets me move my fingers in a natural pattern, and provides a decent amount of resistance. I've also used the Black Diamond "O-Ring" gripper, but I don't like it, some times I can catch my finger from a bad angle and aggrevate old injuries. YMMV.
Dec
7
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
to answer the Bella's question - I use some of those products as a way to warm up when I'm driving to the climbing gym / crag. But I don't think that any of them are all that good at building finger strength. @Bella - do you have access to a climbing gym or outdoor climbing where you could actually climb 2 or more times a week? You'll see good progress from doing that, esp. if you're a beginner. You can include other stuff in your training plan (like hangboards), but they come with a risk of injury, and you need to know how to fit them in and adjust your training plan to be safe.
Dec
7
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
+1 Performance Rock Climbing is a great book
Dec
7
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
hey man, I'm sorry. I got a bit snippier than I meant to. I went back to edit my comment, but you had already replied to it.
Dec
7
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
Your argument was that because you can do it, every beginning climber should be able to as well. Which is not true. That was precisely what I was disagreeing with. I'm happy that it works for you. I didn't mean this as a personal attack. :) Its just out of line with the experiences of friends of mine, and inconsistent with training recommendations that surround hangboards and campus boards.
Dec
6
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
so can I, that's not the point.
Dec
6
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
On fitness.stackexchange.com, there's a habit of asking posters for a lot of personal info before recommending a workout routine. That might fit this question - depending on who you are, hangboard work / fingertip pullups MIGHT be great, or it MIGHT be a bad idea.
Dec
6
comment What hand and finger exercises help with climbing?
I didn't reply for a while, but I have to respectfully disagree... people come into climbing from all sorts of backgrounds. You're kids are no doubt healthy, young, and fairly lightweight, and doing pullups on a medium sized rail might be fine for them. There are also guys that start climbing in middle age, and might be a good bit overweight. I couldn't recommend fingertip pullups for them (even if they can do regular pullups), becuase I don't know anything about their general finger strength.
Dec
3
comment How do I tie a slackline with only carabiners and webbing?
oh, fair enough. Thanks for the edit, though.
Dec
3
comment How do I tie a slackline with only carabiners and webbing?
I haven't rigged one myself, but one point - I believe that you need to use locking carabiners when rigging a slackline because the tension on the system can exceed the open gate strength of a carabiner. If you look at the pictures of rigs in the answers, you'll see that the gates often lay on top of each other. If you're rigging a slackline for a lot of people to use, with all that moving around, there's a definite chance that the carabiners might push on each other's gates. And you wouldn't want a biner to shatter when you're on the slackline. :)
Nov
27
comment How to heal “blown tips” faster after a climb?
well, no. but you do come off as someone who's trying to ignore clear messages from his body. :) High level climbers have a nearly 100% rate of joint issues with their fingers / elbows / shoulders. If you want to climb for a long time, you need to learn how to listen to your body, and when to back off. :)
Nov
14
comment Jerky or Freeze-dried food : Is the salt they contain a concern?
different people are going to have different tolerances for things like this. I'd recommend that you experiment with foods on short trips (day trips, overnight trips) and see what works for you, before going out on long multi-day excursions. I personally can't deal with the sodium levels in freeze dried backpacking meals because the affect my blood pressure to much, but most of my friends love them.
Nov
11
comment Energy bars for outdoors activities: what are the important criteria?
good point on hydration. I don't do muck backpacking these days, if I'm outside I'm usually sport climbing, and having plenty of water is usually pretty easy. I remember that I worried about sodium a lot more when I was backpacking.
Nov
10
answered Winter food : Should I change my habits for winter?
Nov
9
answered Energy bars for outdoors activities: what are the important criteria?