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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Dec 10 '13 at 23:50

Just another software engineer. Longtime outdoor sports enthauist. Avid rock climber.


Aug
16
comment Are trekking poles proven to be helpful?
alphagalileo.org/ViewItem.aspx?ItemId=77477&CultureCode=en Here's a link to a study where researchers found about a 25% less fatigue to the leg muscles of a group of hikers who hiked up and down a mountain in the UK, with and without trekking poles.
Aug
15
comment How dangerous is it to fall 3 meters when lead climbing?
can I ask, are you asking this question in general, or are you personally trying to get into lead climbing yourself? The answer is (I don't mean to be rude), it could be VERY dangerous (bordering on stupid) for a total beginning climber to try and take a lead fall, or it could be fine. An actual beginning climber should be learning how to toprope first, probably. Do you mean to ask how a climber who had never lead before would get into leading?
Aug
14
comment Will the benefit of an axe outweigh the drawbacks and win over a large knife?
This isn't what you asked, but where are you going hiking? I live on the east coast, and I've always found that if you're out in the woods you can usually get away without an axe (you can find small sticks and fallen branches, and build a fire with those), although an axe is certainly a convenience when you don't care about the extra weight.
Aug
6
comment Who places the anchors that rock climbers use?
on sport routes, the first ascensionist and the bolter are sometimes / often different people. The person placing the bolts defines the route, and he/ she may or may not be athletic enough to be the first one to climb it cleanly. Of course, its bad manners to try and climb a new route without the bolter's permission, if they haven't had a fair chance to get a first ascent.
Aug
3
comment Who places the anchors that rock climbers use?
You may want to read the books "how to climb" by John Long or "Mountaineering: the freedom of the hills", they're both pretty comprehensive introductions to this stuff.
Aug
3
comment Who places the anchors that rock climbers use?
Bolts look like drywall hangers used in construction, which the oldest ones probably were.
Aug
3
comment Who places the anchors that rock climbers use?
Pitons and bolts are distinct things. Pitons are like nails. They're hammered in to a crack by a leader and usually removed by the follower. Sometimes they're left permenantly. The climbing community mostly switched from them to less destructive gear (nuts and cams) 30+ years ago. Bolts are more permenant, and fixed in holes bored with a drill. Bolting is a major undertaking, and probably less than 10% of climbers have ever placed one. Climbs that are protected totally by bolts are usually called "sport climbs", although sometimes a handful of bolts will show up on traditional routes.
Jul
29
comment What do you risk when you ignore blisters and carry on walking?
there's also a distinction between popping a blister, and lancing it, right? or do you use those interchangeably? Lancing is where you take a (sterilized) needle, and puncture the blister from beneath, through other dead skin on your foot, leaving the blister itself intact.
Jul
26
comment How to apply duct tapes and mole skin to prevent blisters?
yeah. they're very thin nylon socks designed to be worn under a larger pair of socks.
Jul
26
comment How to apply duct tapes and mole skin to prevent blisters?
Question - are you wearing "liner socks"? I found those helped me.
Jul
26
comment How to apply duct tapes and mole skin to prevent blisters?
Sounds like a good trip. Any time you get a new pair of shoes or even a new pair of socks you can start getting blisters.
Jul
25
comment What is Arc'Teryx Technical down?
+1 - I like this question. (for anyone not famaliar with Arc'teryx) Arc'Teryx is the one of the most expensive brands of outdoor gear on the market, and possibly one of the best. But I've never been sure what exactly their proprietary technologies are, or if they're nearly good enough to justify the large price difference from other brands. But I have no idea what the answer is.
Jul
24
comment How to apply duct tapes and mole skin to prevent blisters?
hey - I still mean to write something up for this, I've just been pretty busy the last few days. :) Rory's answer is good. I have maybe one or two pointers I could add...
Jul
23
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
+1 - excellent historical prespective
Jul
22
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
Could we move this out of the comments on this answer, we've gone off topic a little. I'm not sure if this should be a separate answer to this question, or its own question, but its going to get buried in the comments.
Jul
22
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
And at the end of the day, getting something solid up fast is best, so you can get off the d@mn mountain before sunset. :)
Jul
22
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
@crasic - but, sure, I think some of the new-fangled systems are more trouble than they're worth sometimes. Personally, I think a regular coordellete knot is a better choice than a fancy "equallete" that John Long is recommending most of the time, but that's a whole different issue"... I've climbed with beginners that think dynamic equalization is mandatory 100% of the time, regardless of how long it takes to set up the anchor, and I find that a little annoying.
Jul
22
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
@crasic - Sure, you should be conservative about changing a system you're used to... But at the same time you shouldn't assume that every historic system is compatible with every new product that comes on the market. For instance, a lot of new harnesses have "speed buckles" on the leg loops, including my new one. Speed buckles are relatively new, and will come loose much more easily than traditional buckles if the autoblock catches them wrong, which is part of why I switched my autoblock to my main belay loop.
Jul
22
comment When climbing should a carabiner ever be clipped to the tie-in loops, and should anything other than a carabiner ever attach to the belay loop?
@crasic - :) look, my comment was really about what to do with carabiner (don't clip it into two points plus the belay device). The top loop may be fine, my point was just that that wasn't want the manufacturers were recommending, and I don't see why you'd go out of your way to encourage people to use it that way. Its tiny and inconvenient to get a carabiner in and out of (at least on most of my harnesses), and there's no reason to give beginners a suspicion that their belay loop isn't 100% designed to belay off of (which an endless stream of beginners seem to think). :)
Jul
21
comment When climbing should a carabiner ever be clipped to the tie-in loops, and should anything other than a carabiner ever attach to the belay loop?
petzl.com/us/outdoor/advice-on-harness-use_us For instance, here Petzl specifically recommends against using only the lower tie-in point to belay or tie in with Petzl harnesses. They don't comment on the use of the upper tie-in point. That is, for harnesses with 2 tie-in points. Some harnesses only have a single tie-in point. I don't know whether or not petzl designs them the same.