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Just another software engineer. Longtime outdoor sports enthauist. Avid rock climber.


Jul
21
comment When climbing should a carabiner ever be clipped to the tie-in loops, and should anything other than a carabiner ever attach to the belay loop?
petzl.com/us/outdoor/advice-on-harness-use_us For instance, here Petzl specifically recommends against using only the lower tie-in point to belay or tie in with Petzl harnesses. They don't comment on the use of the upper tie-in point. That is, for harnesses with 2 tie-in points. Some harnesses only have a single tie-in point. I don't know whether or not petzl designs them the same.
Jul
21
comment When climbing should a carabiner ever be clipped to the tie-in loops, and should anything other than a carabiner ever attach to the belay loop?
If you think that, could you post an answer so that people can formally respond to it? I'm not saying that you're wrong or that doing this hasn't worked for you in the past. But I know that's now how equipment manufacturers recommend people set up belays with modern harnesses (at least I think not). Some modern harnesses are relentlessly optimized to save weight, and only tested as a unit, and I'd want to be careful assuming that any individual piece was rated to catch falls, even if traditional harnesses were. At least, that would be my basic concern.
Jul
21
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
I think there's kind of a couple of independent questions here - "Is it reasonable for a climber to create a secondary belay loop out of webbing or coord" and "Is it reasonable for a climber to cut out his / her belay loop because it isn't needed". Asking why people would insist on second guessing the equipment manufacturer may open a whole can of worms...
Jul
21
comment Why do many climbers appear to not trust their belay loops?
I edited your title. The title originally asked if the belay loop was the strongest part of the harness. But in your first sentence, you asserted an affirmative answer to the question in the title, and asked why then did climbers not trust belay loops. I edited your title to reflect what I think your question asks. I can change it back, if you want.
Jul
17
comment What do you risk when you ignore blisters and carry on walking?
+1 - esp your personal experiences with bad blisters. That's something people can learn from. Thanks.
Jul
16
comment Will barefoot walking harden the skin and help prevent blisters when trekking in heavy shoes?
Also, I've met people that are much better than me at complex applications of duct tape and moleskin, and would like to see what other people had to say.
Jul
16
comment Will barefoot walking harden the skin and help prevent blisters when trekking in heavy shoes?
Thats a good point. But I think its complex enough to warrant its own question and answer. If you want to rack up points for asking it, go ahead. :) (assuming there isn't a question about that already).
Jul
15
comment What style of camelback hydrating systems exist out there?
FWIW, you may want to look at the "military" versions of camelbacks. I've found them to be slightly sturdier than the ones they sell at REI. You can also buy a military version bladder / drinking tube, and put it in a regular "civilian" pack.
Jul
15
comment Hardening the skin on the whole body (not only soles)
purely within climbing, I found it better to just tape my hands up, and spend my time working on technique, rather than spending the hours a week working on my skin. My $0.02.
Jul
15
comment Hardening the skin on the whole body (not only soles)
you need to be careful with this. Instead of building callouses, you may get an abrasion and wind up building scar tissue (which is weaker than regular skin). In rock climbing, there's a technique called "hand jamming", where you use your hands as wedges to climb a crack system. I have met old climbers out West with crazy callouses on the back of their hands. But whenever I try and climb hard hand-cracks without athletic tape, I just scrape myself. As a weekend warrior, I don't think I could duplicate the lifetime of climbing it would take to slowly build those calluses.
Jul
15
comment Why can't a Figure-of-8 descender be used for SRT?
I may be wrong, but is this a caving question? Should we add the "caving" tag?
Jul
11
comment How do I know that I need to add an insole to my shoe?
FWIW - I've been to the knee doctor a couple times in the past 10 years. I only got prescribed surgery when I had an injury that was very acute. The other time (8 years ago), the doctor recommended a conservative (non surgery) solution, and that worked very well ( until I reinjured it separately, years later). Find a good doctor in your area, and a good PT (that deals with athletes or runners) and you should be on the right path.
Jul
11
comment Commuting by canoe
+1 - by all means, share your experiences after a month or two, it would be interesting to see how this works out.
Jul
10
comment How do I know that I need to add an insole to my shoe?
Yeah... you might need to see a doctor. I don't have any particularly great advice to give you. Its hard to find a good doctor. Are there any local running clubs in your area? You could ask around with them, maybe find a doctor / and or physical therapist that is used to helping active people solve their knee problems... But, if there's a certain pair of shoes that seems to help, I'd suggest you keep wearing them in the mean time.
Jul
9
comment How do I know that I need to add an insole to my shoe?
How bad are your knee problems? Do they only show up when you're hiking? Only when you're hiking very long distances? Do they affect you when you're walking around day-to-day, or when you're trying to sleep?
Jul
9
comment How do I know that I need to add an insole to my shoe?
+1. Definitely find a doctor or physical therapist that is used to dealing with athletes... Maybe runners? But don't presume that every ortho is good at dealing with athletes. Some ortho's are pure surgeons, and like to cut.
Jul
8
comment What are the minimum set of shoes required for hiking outdoors
oh, I didn't see you mention you were having knee and ankle problems... I don't know your situation, but I'd go to an REI or some similar store and talk about that with the shop clerk. Some ankle problems may be fixed by wearing boots instead of shoes, and sometimes knee problems can be fixed by wearing a 3rd party shoe insert (like Super Feet), but sometimes not. (i.e., maybe you have a minor underlying orthopedic issue), and its hard to really pin that down on an internet forum.
Jul
7
comment What are the minimum set of shoes required for hiking outdoors
I'll try and write a good write up later, if no one else has. But there are kind of too many options on the market. The shoes are usually high quality, but very specialized (hiking shoes vs trail running shoes vs hiking sandals vs light boots). Minimally, you just need a comfortable shoe that doesn't give you blisters. If you're hiking over rocky terrain, a "vibram" brand sole may be nice. If you're especially worried about your ankles you may want a boot instead of a shoe. No shoe is really going to be very waterproof, because the top of the shoe is too low to really keep water out.
Jun
24
comment Can I eat rotten meat and carcass providing enough cooking?
There needs to be some references for this (at least), it could potentially get someone hurt.
Jun
19
comment Should I be worried about bears when sleeping in a hammock?
+1 - proper handling, cooking, and storage of food is what will make a difference, not whether you're in a tent or hammock.