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seen Sep 13 at 13:57

Just another software engineer. Longtime outdoor sports enthauist. Avid rock climber.


Jun
18
comment Sustainable systems for carrying out human waste
Some very popular climbing destinations (Yosemite Valley, Mt Whitney) require people to carry out their waste because of the high volume of climbers. On multi-day rock climbs in Yosimite (for instance, El Capitan or Half Dome), climbers have to plan on carrying out multiple day's worth of waste. Its... actually the grossest part of that sort of climbing. :)
Jun
13
comment Identifying named peaks from the summit of a north-american peak
question - if there was a product like Google Image Search that could identify peaks, is it something you could rely on when you're in the backcountry, without a reliable wireless data connection, or the ability to recharge a device?
Jun
2
comment What to teach someone who wants to start lead climbing?
+1 - esp the note about obstinate "outdoor only" climbers. Indoor climbing may feel like a phony substitute to some, but its a great place to sharpen basic skills, especially belay and lead belay skills. Its shameful whenever you meet an "experienced" trad climber who doesn't understand how to give a soft catch for a lead fall.
May
27
comment What's the mountain on North Face's ad?
@MiguelMadero - I'm voting to close. As it stands now, its about an advertisement that is specifically in San Franscisco. If you can upload the picture, or provide a link, I'd vote to reopen.
May
27
comment What's the mountain on North Face's ad?
Can you link to the ad? North Face has many ads. :)
May
25
comment what to do with the lap coiled rope if the belayer wishes to lead consecutive pitches
It might me. I've never used one on a multipitch route, only on sport climbs. I'd think that flipping the rope over efficiently may be an issue with a rope bucket. I did used a "rope hook" once: metoliusclimbing.com/rope_hook.html You could take the coils out and flip them around to "restack".
May
20
comment swapping lead when climbing in a group of three using a pair of half ropes
Are you describing having the two followers both tie into the same rope? I have seen people do that, but its pretty sketchy, and much safer just to borrow a 2nd rope from someone, and bring the two followers separately. Each person gets their own rope.
May
17
comment swapping lead when climbing in a group of three using a pair of half ropes
I don't have an answer, other than to just not to do multipitch routes with 3 people. Every time I've done it I regretted it.
May
17
comment swapping lead when climbing in a group of three using a pair of half ropes
+1. And your question is about how to do this efficiently, right? How to avoid a massive rope tangle, and 15+ minutes at the belay, trying to transition?
May
15
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
Thanks for clarifying the length of the routes... The same day you posted this, someone asked a different question about toproping 200' routes outdoors. I (at least) was thinking in those terms when I saw your question. :)
May
15
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
And I think there was an old meta about this, in the context of avalanche safety...
May
15
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
I can, but it'll be a few hours. (About to go to a meeting)
May
15
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
Can we take this into a meta discussion? :)
May
15
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
When the route moves sideways instead of straight up and down. It introduces the chance of swinging. It esp becomes an issue on routes that weren't intended to be toproped - a route may traverse 15' or more, and introduce wild swings. A route that was a safe lead may have a pendulum that could result in hitting the ground or a buttress of rock. Sometimes.
May
15
comment Toproping with two ropes joined by a double fisherman's
Rope manufacturers publish "elongation" statistics, which I believe are UIAA certified. Accidents are going to be tricky, because they only get reported if there was a rescue. In this scenario, the climber may get a sprained / broken ankle from too much rope stretch,, but could still be lowered by his friends, probably.
May
15
comment Toproping with two ropes joined by a double fisherman's
You could look at the material associated with the AMGA "Single Pitch Instructor" course, but I think it's only available if you take a class from them (no online).
May
14
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
I'll edit. I actually keep it at the point where there is neither slack or tension, but that's a little tricky and takes experience belaying.
May
14
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
:) ahhh! such a preference thing. I shouldn't have answered it... I don't think you can write an answer that captures everyone's possible preferences, while also making sure that a beginning climber doesn't deck his friend.
May
14
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
hey - part of why people are having a hard time giving a concise answer for this is that there are vastly different scenarios where one may be toproping, and the answer changes between them. Are you talking about gym-climbing (or climbing outside on 50' or less cliffs, where the route doesn't traverse, and there aren't ledges in the middle of the route)? Because there is a simple answer for that question. :)
May
14
comment How tight should the line be kept for toproping?
part of the problem is that there are multiple audiences reading these questions. Experienced climbers, who just have narrow technical questions, and beginners, who don't understand the full context, and can and do miss-interpret the things they read.