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Jul 31 '17 at 9:39 comment added Separatrix @mattnz, and half a pace forwards as the rope jerks, it all adds up.
Jul 30 '17 at 12:26 comment added SomeoneSomewhereSupportsMonica I would expect the end of the fall to be at least 2G of deceleration. As far as rope stretch is concerned, your weight just doubled.
Jul 29 '17 at 4:14 comment added user5330 Splitting hairs - A bit of stretch, a bit because the belayer was not keeping up to where they normally would be and the climber falls a lot further than expected.
Jul 28 '17 at 12:56 history edited Separatrix CC BY-SA 3.0
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Jul 28 '17 at 11:17 history edited Separatrix CC BY-SA 3.0
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Jul 28 '17 at 11:11 history edited Separatrix CC BY-SA 3.0
added 164 characters in body
Jul 28 '17 at 11:06 comment added Separatrix @imsodin, as you say it may exceed 10%, but most climbers seem to be lighter than 80kg so the difference probably isn't significant
Jul 28 '17 at 11:01 comment added imsodin The following might be implied by what you wrote, but it's not clear: 10% is the maximum elongation on static load of 80kg. Even if the rope was reasonable tight, falling in a top-rope is not really static. Given that she mentions a possibility of slack, this is even less the case. So the norm does not guarantee max 10% elongation in this case.
Jul 28 '17 at 10:52 history answered Separatrix CC BY-SA 3.0