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3 added 75 characters in body
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A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavored soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbs more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't
  10. Know your bugs. Being stuck in a swarm of bugs is less mentally painful if you know these bugs don't sting. And mental pain is bad because panic and stress get you breathing harder and creating more of the above-discussed CO2
  11. The smoke of a camp fire can help keep some insects and animals at bay

Of course, no matter what you do, you will be bitten and stung. A few more tricks:

  1. Don't scratch, ever. Scratching once can turn a mosquito bite from a half-hour thing to a many-day thing because you're ruining the clean little needle whole and turning it into an infection-prone tear. Wrap with clean dry fabric to avoid scratching during the night.
  2. Otherwise leaving the skin uncovered helps prevent moisture from setting in and gives the "wound" plenty of access to oxygen, two things which help speed up "convalescence"
  3. Remove any dart, dirt or debris and clean gently (again to avoid infection)
  4. Sooth with after-bite ointments, ice, submerge in cold water

A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavored soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbs more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't
  10. Know your bugs. Being stuck in a swarm of bugs is less mentally painful if you know these bugs don't sting. And mental pain is bad because panic and stress get you breathing harder and creating more of the above-discussed CO2

Of course, no matter what you do, you will be bitten and stung. A few more tricks:

  1. Don't scratch, ever. Scratching once can turn a mosquito bite from a half-hour thing to a many-day thing because you're ruining the clean little needle whole and turning it into an infection-prone tear. Wrap with clean dry fabric to avoid scratching during the night.
  2. Otherwise leaving the skin uncovered helps prevent moisture from setting in and gives the "wound" plenty of access to oxygen, two things which help speed up "convalescence"
  3. Remove any dart, dirt or debris and clean gently (again to avoid infection)
  4. Sooth with after-bite ointments, ice, submerge in cold water

A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavored soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbs more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't
  10. Know your bugs. Being stuck in a swarm of bugs is less mentally painful if you know these bugs don't sting. And mental pain is bad because panic and stress get you breathing harder and creating more of the above-discussed CO2
  11. The smoke of a camp fire can help keep some insects and animals at bay

Of course, no matter what you do, you will be bitten and stung. A few more tricks:

  1. Don't scratch, ever. Scratching once can turn a mosquito bite from a half-hour thing to a many-day thing because you're ruining the clean little needle whole and turning it into an infection-prone tear. Wrap with clean dry fabric to avoid scratching during the night.
  2. Otherwise leaving the skin uncovered helps prevent moisture from setting in and gives the "wound" plenty of access to oxygen, two things which help speed up "convalescence"
  3. Remove any dart, dirt or debris and clean gently (again to avoid infection)
  4. Sooth with after-bite ointments, ice, submerge in cold water
2 A few more tricks for when you've been bitten already
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A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavouredflavored soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbesabsorbs more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't
  10. Know your bugs. Being stuck in a swarm of bugs is less mentally painful if you know these bugs don't sting. And mental pain is bad because panic and stress get you breathing harder and creating more of the above-discussed CO2

Of course, no matter what you do, you will be bitten and stung. A few more tricks:

  1. Don't scratch, ever. Scratching once can turn a mosquito bite from a half-hour thing to a many-day thing because you're ruining the clean little needle whole and turning it into an infection-prone tear. Wrap with clean dry fabric to avoid scratching during the night.
  2. Otherwise leaving the skin uncovered helps prevent moisture from setting in and gives the "wound" plenty of access to oxygen, two things which help speed up "convalescence"
  3. Remove any dart, dirt or debris and clean gently (again to avoid infection)
  4. Sooth with after-bite ointments, ice, submerge in cold water

A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavoured soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbes more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't

A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavored soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbs more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't
  10. Know your bugs. Being stuck in a swarm of bugs is less mentally painful if you know these bugs don't sting. And mental pain is bad because panic and stress get you breathing harder and creating more of the above-discussed CO2

Of course, no matter what you do, you will be bitten and stung. A few more tricks:

  1. Don't scratch, ever. Scratching once can turn a mosquito bite from a half-hour thing to a many-day thing because you're ruining the clean little needle whole and turning it into an infection-prone tear. Wrap with clean dry fabric to avoid scratching during the night.
  2. Otherwise leaving the skin uncovered helps prevent moisture from setting in and gives the "wound" plenty of access to oxygen, two things which help speed up "convalescence"
  3. Remove any dart, dirt or debris and clean gently (again to avoid infection)
  4. Sooth with after-bite ointments, ice, submerge in cold water
1
source | link

A few tricks in no particular order:

  1. Long sleeves and wearable netting for your face
  2. Tiger Balm behind your ears (smell keeps bugs away from your face)
  3. Bug spray on your clothing (around your collar, ends of sleeves, in your netting) stays there longer than on sweaty skin
  4. Avoid flavoured soaps and shampoos a few weeks before the trip
  5. Cover your skin with mud
  6. Cool down your body temperature (a lot of bugs are attracted to heat)
  7. Stay calm (some bugs are attracted to the CO2 we breathe out, staying calm reduces the amount)
  8. Wear light-colored clothes (white is best) as dark tends to attract some bugs and also dark absorbes more heat which also attracts bugs
  9. Stand near the people who follow the advice above and far from those who don't