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You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

Note: my experiences are mostly from the 1990s and early 2000s. Perhaps the situation has changed; see also goingglacials answergoingglacials answer.

You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

Note: my experiences are mostly from the 1990s and early 2000s. Perhaps the situation has changed; see also goingglacials answer.

You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

Note: my experiences are mostly from the 1990s and early 2000s. Perhaps the situation has changed; see also goingglacials answer.

2 added note of warning
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You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

Note: my experiences are mostly from the 1990s and early 2000s. Perhaps the situation has changed; see also goingglacials answer.

You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.

Note: my experiences are mostly from the 1990s and early 2000s. Perhaps the situation has changed; see also goingglacials answer.

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You cannot book most huts in advance. You simply arrive and get a place to sleep. If you're late then you will have to sleep on the floor. Places are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. I speak from (limited) experience.

I haven't slept in huts much, but I've visited quite often, and most are quite basic. There are some modern huts that can be reserved, but if they can be, you certainly don't need to reserve more than a few days ahead.

You can search for huts at the Swiss Alpine Club website. Then, check the individual huts' websites for information such as opening hours. For example, the Cabane des Dix. To be sure, you might want to check the website for the huts where you will pass by and write down their phone numbers, so you can call them the morning before you arrive. Considering sudden changes in weather, any reservation more than a few days in advance is in any case too risky.