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Is there a standard measure for textile properties such as windproof, waterproof, breathability, elasticity, drying time, comfort?

Is there a website that has a list of different textiles in the industry with these measures?

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    there are several measures for various properties. waterproofness is measure by static head pressure, usually in mm. breathability is measured in the amount of vapor that can pass through the fabric in a given period of time. it can also be measured in RET in France, whatever that means. Comfort is subjective. – njzk2 Dec 14 '15 at 3:56
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    also no one lists all fabrics in the the industry because there are a lot, and new ones everyday, and most are specific to a brand. – njzk2 Dec 14 '15 at 3:57
  • @njzk2 It's completely up to you, and I could certainly be wrong, but your comments look like an answer to me; or at least enough good information to be written as one. :) – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Dec 15 '15 at 17:03
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    I'm not sure what the policy is here about giving outside sources for information, but a Google search brought up this, which has some information about properties of different types of outerwear. – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Dec 15 '15 at 17:06
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Actually, there is an international standard for waterproof-ness of textiles, but it's only used in factories for QA. ISO 15496:2004 involves measuring the "water vapour permeability of textiles". IIRC, there's no number for classification that you can use to compare and contrast products, but some factories might release data sheets showing various measurements of diffusion "through the textile per square metre, per hour and per unit difference of water vapour pressure across the textile".

There aren't really any widely recognized standards for drying time or breathability or comfort etc, and there probably won't/shouldn't be. These are far more qualitative than you think. For example, "breathability" is far more than letting air and water vapor in and out. You'd have to standardize what "breathability" means first.

Same deal with "drying time". What does it mean for a clothing item to be "dry"? You'd have to standardize what "dry clothing" means first. etc etc

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