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A lot of people swear on their shooting sacks as their training target. They take a potato bag or something else and put foil rests etc. in it.

Shooting sack

I really want to try things out but I'm unable to get my hands (not too easy at least) on foil waste. What would be other suitable "recycle-materials"?

  • some are filled with shrink wrap (used stuff) – Erik vanDoren Jun 23 '16 at 12:05
  • Our range uses lots of plastic bags compressed in the bales. Off cuts of foam, polystyrene, card board. – Desorder Jun 24 '16 at 2:19
  • I'm certainly not an expert on this, but I do like cardboard for making tragets, as it does allow for a lot of penetration which reducess the stress on the arrows. – flawr Jun 26 '16 at 18:30
  • @flawr Yep, that works perfectly fine :) See this question: outdoors.stackexchange.com/questions/11795/… However, I'm looking for a list of things suitable to stop an arrow which can be filled in a sack. I need inspiration kind of... – OddDeer Jun 27 '16 at 7:36
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Old cotton clothing and rags work very well at stopping arrows.

Save those old tshirts, jeans, and socks that are too worn out to be used as second hand clothing. Stuff them into a burlap bag or cardboard box and use them as archery targets.

That's what I used to do. I would stuff all of our old, completely worn-out clothing in a large cardboard box. When it was full, I'd tape it shut and use it for archery practice. When the box starts falling apart, just get another box and transfer the old clothing. The now-shredded clothing is still good enough to keep stopping arrows, but it will have settled a bit, so throw in some more old clothing and tape it shut again.

I've only shot cardboard boxes filled with old clothing. I'm sure a burlap bag or those plasticy potato bags would work very well, too.

I've only used cotton clothing. I don't know how other materials will hold up.

Very important: This works just for field tips. Don't ever use broadheads on a target filled with old clothing. In order to remove your arrow, you'll need to unscrew the broadhead - which will require you to open the box (or bag) and dig (and probably get a severe cut).

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