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I have noticed a few people are using blue light bulbs for the front porch and/or walk way. The light is not very bright and does not cast what I would call sufficient lighting. On some streets half the illuminated evening porch lights are blue.

Why might people choose a blue light, to light outdoor areas in the evening?

closed as off-topic by Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL, Wills, knitti, OddDeer, gerrit May 3 '17 at 10:24

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    Blue lighting is becoming commonly used in restrooms because druggies can not see their veins in blue light. This is quite commonplace where I live. "Blue lighting is sometimes used in public toilets (restrooms) to make it more difficult for drug users to inject themselves (veins are harder to see)". - A vein attempt? – Ken Graham Apr 22 '17 at 13:14
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    What part of the world is this? Looking at your profile, you're from Pittsburgh. I found some articles that say blue bulbs in Kentucky were used to support a police officer who was killed on duty. I know (as a former PA resident) that Eric Frein who killed a PA State Trooper was sentenced on a few days ago (April 19th). Maybe the blue lights are in remembrance of the State Trooper he killed? – Timmy Jim Apr 22 '17 at 13:31
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it doesn't seem to fit What topics can I ask about here, which is also the definition of our site, as stated in the tour: The Great Outdoors Stack Exchange is for people who love outdoor activities, excursions, and outdoorsmanship. – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Apr 29 '17 at 15:43
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Why use blue lights on your porch?

Blue light deter druggies from injecting themselves because they cannot see their veins so easily. Junkies keep away!

Blue lighting is sometimes used in public toilets (restrooms) to make it more difficult for drug users to inject themselves (veins are harder to see).

It was more difficult to see my veins through my skin, but there was normal-coloured lighting in the street outside, and one would assume that the users would thus just go outside instead, though the risk of detection is greater. (An additional result of the blue lighting is that, on going outside after spending more than a few seconds in the toilets, the daytime world appears much brighter and more optimistic, even on an overcast day: could retail designers or others make use of this effect? Do they already?) - A vein attempt?

As Timmy Jim points out in his comment people use blue lights to show support to fallen police in the line of duty.

Some people use them for the Fourth of July holiday:

Burke said his customers began asking for blue lights Wednesday. Since then, he estimates, his Home Depot store has sold between 50 and 60 blue lights. Normally, the store sells one to five a week. Usually, he said, residents want blue lights for parties or the Fourth of July holiday. - Area residents flipping switches to blue porch lights to back police

There is also the Blue Light Safety Project:

This is the Blue Light Safety Project.

A blue light signifies that this house is a temporary safe space, open to anyone that feels in danger or threatened. Knock on the door and the residents will provide support until you feel safer or can make other arrangements. If no one is home, you are welcome to sit on the porch for a short time until you feel safe to continue on your way.

The project is an attempt to provide safety in our community outside of institutional solutions such as police. - Blue Light Safety Project

Or you could be like me. I use a blue light on my porch simply because I do not want a lot of white light coming in through the window!

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    Maybe some people just like blue? Though I do wish people would tell me when certain colors are supposed to symbolize things, lest I accidentially cause them to think that I'm supporting something, when I'm actually neutral, opposed, or simply unaware. – jamesqf Apr 23 '17 at 18:10
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    The beginning of this answer is confusing. If you have a problem with people coming onto your porch to do drugs, I guess that makes sense. However, the 1st quoted article doesn't answer the question. The quote relates to indoor public rest-room lighting, not outdoor porch lights. The first link in that quote is dead, so even if I wanted to learn more, I can't. Would you consider removing that? Thanks! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Apr 23 '17 at 22:22
  • Ken Graham, the first link in the quote is now working for me, so I correct the part of my comment stating that it was dead. The main comment is still how I feel, though. – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Apr 29 '17 at 15:52
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Blue is also the color used for autism awareness. Typically April is autism awareness month.

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