2

After boiling water it went from clear to brownish red. I boiled the clear water in a stainless steel pan and as it was boiling it started to become brownish red. The more I boiled it the more pronounced it became. I put the boiled water in a glass and compared it to the same water before boiling and it was clear. Just to further test if this was the water or the pan I used purified water and boiled it in the same pan and it was clear. What's going on? Why is my water brownish-red after boiling? enter image description here

marked as duplicate by Reinstate Monica, ShemSeger, Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL, Ken Graham, Wills Sep 9 '17 at 6:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Welcome Lee Anne Jarrett! Were you using this water for any outdoor purpose, or just to use in your kitchen? I'm asking because our site is about outdoor activities. However, there is someone who had an issue while doing an outdoor activity (camping), and it seems to be the same problem. The question is referred to in the link posted by @CharlieBrumbaugh. This question might get what we call "closed as a duplicate" because the other was already here and has answers that will hopefully help you. – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Sep 8 '17 at 21:24
  • Our site is different from others, and a visit to our help center is the best way to learn why. How to Ask is always a good place to start. You can make sure the question is on-topic for the site and learn the best way to ask it. Your question was asked very well! I'd also like to link you directly to the page that explains the process of question closure in case that happens. If you have any questions about how the site works, leave a comment here and someone will help you! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Sep 8 '17 at 21:32
  • Not a duplicate. agent is likely different. Try this as an experiment: Instead of boiling the water, just set it out in the open for a day or so. If it goes brown, you are seeing colloidal iron. Iron can have two valences Fe++ and Fe+++ The first is water soluble. In the presence of oxygen it reacts to form Fe2O3 which is insoluble. If this is the agent, you will also notice rust stains from dripping faucets and in toilets. A further test: Acidifying the water (couple drops of CLR) will turn it clear again. – Sherwood Botsford Sep 13 '17 at 13:42
  • @SherwoodBotsford I do not understand from your description what the difference in setup is between this question and the duplicate. What I mean: Why does the agent you describe work here and not on the other question? – imsodin Sep 13 '17 at 15:56