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Inspired mostly by this answer, if I were to decide to buy a set of throwing knives for just for fun, what exactly should I be looking for?

I do realize that throwing knives are not legal everywhere, but they are legal where I am at.

Are there features that would make one set better than another?

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  • Are you intending it for sport, hunting or self defense? I know you say "just for fun", so I would assume just sport/target throwing? Also, should we assume that you are a novice, or have some experience? – JohnP Dec 18 '17 at 19:39
  • @JohnP Just target throwing and I have very little experience with them – Charlie Brumbaugh Dec 18 '17 at 19:54
  • Ok. I'm at work, I'll try to get an answer up for you later today. – JohnP Dec 18 '17 at 19:56
  • the balance of weight is a big factor, they should be able to balance on your finger near the center, where the blade begins, also i prefer those that can be thrown by holding the blade, this is the real way if you ask me as if you throw by the handle calculating an additional half twist is difficult especially for beginners. – Nate W Dec 18 '17 at 21:39
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You want knives that are not easily broken by repeated (repeated hundreds of times) misstrikes. You will notice that knives labeled as "throwing knives" at retail are most often free of any bolster, guard, handle scales, etc. That's because those things will be destroyed in the learning process.

The key to successfully throwing a knife lies in repetition with the same knife. Only a superb champion of the craft would be likely to "stick" a knife he has never practiced with. Along these lines, a balanced knife is easier to learn with; however, any knife can be thrown and stuck if you practice long enough with it.

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