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I am beginning to fish. I bought a beginner's tackle kit. After some googling I figured out what most of the stuff is. But I didn't find anything on these three items. What are they and how do I use them?

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What you have is two jigs and a spinner (on the right). The basic idea is that you cast them out and then reel them back in and the fish think they are small fish swimming by and try and eat them.

You don't want to pull them in a straight line, rather pull in a more random fashion with small jerks and tugs in different directions. The spinner is offset for this reason.

I'd try the two on the right first.

  • The one on the right: How do I connect that too my line? Is that supposed to be used with a "Curly Tailed Grub On A Jig Head"? – Stainsor Jul 2 at 20:35
  • @Stainsor - On the side of the jig head that has the hook's point, (left side in the pic) there should be an eyelet (the bump on the jig head). New jigs usually have these covered in paint. Scrape off the paint and thread your line through the eyelet. Try to keep the eyelet free of nicks and burrs. Also, be aware that you can change the body of that jig and re-use the jig head. – B540Glenn Jul 3 at 14:15
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Jigs - what you have on the left - can be bounced off the bottom, or suspended beneath a float (typically on a slip line with a stop of some type). From what I understand about ice fishing, they can even be held relatively steady at a fixed depth/point.

Spinners - lots of variations on this theme, what you have in the middle is an in-line spinner. Cast it out, and immediately start retrieving. Motion through the water will make the blade spin and flash, try varying your speed, etc. to change behavior.

On the right, you have a spinner and arm, but that is all. By itself, this will do nothing for you - it doesn't even have a hook :) However, you can combine this with a jig and together they make an off-set spinner. Much like the in-line spinner, cast and retrieve immediately, vary speed for depth control, etc.

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