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I don’t know if shooting animals and eating them such as catch and cook in England is specified as poaching these days so anyone who gets what I’m actually trying to say I would appreciate if u do inform me about this stuff 😂👌 thanks

marked as duplicate by Jan Doggen, Aravona, Michel Keijzers, Gabriel C., ab2 Jul 12 at 12:20

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Note: I'm not from the UK, but a quick search of the laws relating to poaching is pretty easy.

Note: THERE ARE MANY ANIMALS IT IS ABSOLUTELY FORBIDDEN TO HUNT/SHOOT (think large large fines and jail time). Always identify your target.

The short answer is: Yes - it's illegal apart from under certain specific circumstances.

Longer answer: Poaching is illegal. Poaching is defined as the illegal taking of animals and plants from the environment. Many traditional hunting/shooting sites are on private land, and it is considered poaching to hunt/shoot on these lands without express permission of the land-owner. It is also considered poaching to shoot animals owned by anyone (e.g. someone's sheep or cow). It is also considered poaching to harvest (at least some) wild plant species and many marine/aquatic species. Poaching also encompasses not having a hunting/shooting/fishing licence for the species caught/killed.

There are only certain animals that are allowed to be shot/hunted and even for those there are closed seasons where shooting/hunting are not allowed at all, or only in limited numbers (certain number of animals/person per day or [hunting] season etc). Open seasons and bag limits vary according to the species being targeted, and where you are in the country. You are also required to have a licence to hunt/shoot for the game species being targeted.

If you are caught poaching, it means large fines and/or jail time!

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    Regarding plants, the Wildlife and Countryside Act (1981) makes it illegal “to uproot any wild plant without permission from the landowner or occupier” in Britain. The term ‘uproot’ is defined as “to dig up or otherwise remove the plant from the land on which it is growing”. Picking parts of a plant (leaves, flower stems, fruit and seed) is therefore OK, as long as you don’t remove or uproot the whole plant. – Weather Vane Jul 11 at 7:29
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The gun laws in UK are extremely tight. A firearm at your house must be licensed and kept in a locked cabinet. Even being in possession of a firearm in a public place in the UK without a lawful reason is an offence, never mind what you indend to shoot.

This site: Carrying your firearm in a public place – what does the law say? says

Shooters may not realise that they do not have an automatic right to take a gun into a public place and that their firearm or shotgun certificate does not give them lawful authority to do so.

and this

A person commits an offence if, without lawful authority or reasonable excuse (the proof whereof lies on him) he has with him in a public place:

  1. a loaded shot gun;

  2. an air weapon (whether loaded or not);

  3. any other firearm (whether loaded or not) together with ammunition suitable for use in that firearm, or;

  4. an imitation firearm.

The maximum sentences for these offences is seven years. Five-year mandatory prison sentences apply for prohibited weapons.

and

The definition of ‘public place’ is wide. You should assume that the default position is that anywhere aside from your home will likely be deemed a public place.

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