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In Poland Polish Tourist and Sightseeing Society (PTTK), has created set of badges that can be awarded to tourists for various achievements in different activities (hiking, skiing, kayaking, etc).

These are physical badges (pins) that are awarded to person only after submitting logbook proving that they met the conditions. Photos.

I was wondering if there are any other organizations worldwide having similar system of badges/pins/patches awarded to tourists for some achievements/quests.

  • I think this is in scope. Also made it CW, so people can contribute easily and it's really wiki style question. Also was not sure about what tags to use here. – pbm Sep 24 at 18:33
  • Hi pbm! For people that may be new to our system, I just want to quickly explain what CW is, especially before more answers start popping up! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Sep 25 at 0:23
  • 2
    CW stands for Community Wiki, which is a single answer to the question, and should be edited instead of adding new answers. It has no rep and everyone can contribute. From the Help Center: CWs "have been donated to the community in hopes that others will edit them to keep them up to date, to add useful information, and generally improve their quality." They're most useful with questions that might be off topic as "lists" or that "might become obsolete." This page in the Help center explains it best! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Sep 25 at 0:43
  • The US National Park Service has a popular passport program where you collect stamps for visiting parks. There is no activity requirement though. The FAI awards badges for various aviation feats, which doesn't require tourism though it's natural to travel somewhere scenic when earning them. – Matthew Gauthier Sep 25 at 18:07
  • Just as an aside, CW is now generally deprecated, or at least not encouraged, across SE, as "lists" and "offtopic" are more strictly observed. – Rory Alsop Sep 27 at 12:06
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North America

USA

Eastern USA

Canada

Québec

Europe

Poland

UK

  • Dartmoor Letterboxing is mainly restricted to Dartmoor, Devon. It's something of a precursor to geocaching: boxes with stamps and visitor books are hidden - or kept behind the bar in pubs etc. The 100 club issues patches for finding 100 (and multiples).
  • Long-distance cyclists can join Audax UK and then buy patches for various achievements starting from 50 km rides, seeing the country as they do so.

Austria

This concept is known in German as "Wandernadel" and implemented by a lot of local tourist assiciations, usually in the form of a "book" you can stamp at designated stamp stations on interesting locations. Examples are Vienna, Schladming, Gastein, but there are many more if you google the term.

(The same seems to be true in parts of Germany, there's at least a Harzer Wandernadel.)

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