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Are there any larger "wild" forested areas left in continental Europe, where a group of people could (in theory) sustainably live as hunter-gatherers?

Looking at maps of forested areas, I struggled to find a larger area with enough supposed wildlife where I could imagine a group of (say) 100 people could sustainably survive just hunting wild animals and picking berries. Perhaps the Carpathian mountains in Romania and Ukraine? What about Western Europe (France, Germany...): anything there that could in theory work?

Ps: by "large enough", I also mean large enough not to run into "regular people". I.e. is there any wilderness left in continental Europe, where a group of (say) 100 people could live in at least (say) 20km by 20km area of nature, without regularly being disturbed by tourists and hikers?

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    You are aware that there is no place in Germany that is further than ≈6.3 km away from houses? So what exactly do you mean with "not run into people? a) being get around so they won't be seen by people or b) never see other people? Also, 100 people is IMHO rather large for one group of hunter-gatherers: doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0611197104 predicts roughtly 2500 km² for a terrestric hunter-gatherer population of size 100 - that would be a 50 x 50 km square or a circle with 28 km radius. That would be like taking the Kreis Ostprignitz-Ruppin (correct size, one of the Kreise with lowest... – cbeleites unhappy with SX Oct 8 at 16:56
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    In UK there is no wild land, in the sense that it is all owned. In Scotland there are some large areas that could be called wilderness, but a group of 100 people living there would be quite against the spirit of its "freedom to roam" policy. You'd have to put up with organised excursions by other people looking for the wilderness experience too. It's been done, for a TV doc and IIR after a few months they were all gasping for TV and take-aways. – Weather Vane Oct 8 at 18:39
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    @JanStuller You'd even have to look hard to find a place with no house in a 6km radius (there's lots of small huts etc.), but without tourists? Impossible. The Schwarzwald is completely criss-crossed with hiking paths. – helm Oct 8 at 18:40
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    Thank you so much for all the responses so far: they in a way confirm my "worry" that there is no real wilderness left in central and western Europe. For a real taste of wilderness without much tourism, one would probably really have to venture to the carpathian forests of Ukraine and Romania...I can't think of any other region in Europe. Correct me if I am wrong? – Jan Stuller Oct 8 at 18:59
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    At the risk of stating the obvious, a plane ticket to Canada will give you access to wilderness where 100 people could disappear and be virtually certain of never meeting anyone else. – DJClayworth Oct 9 at 13:52
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If this question is academic, Lapland or parts of Spain have very low density of people. Cannot say about gathering, but hunting and fishing are subject to legal regulation, so if we keep these in mind the answer is nowhere in the world where the rule of law applies. Indigenous communities can have special hunting rights (depending on country and legal system), but this is a different kettle of fish. Obviously there are places where the rule of law does not apply, but said places are normally in a state of war, so I'd avoid them.

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