12

I use hat + hood + sunglasses + neck gaiter + UV umbrella to fully covered my face when going outside if too much sun. The problem is the upper part of my nose is not fully covered, e.g.:

enter image description here

Larger pics:

enter image description here enter image description here

(image source 1 ; image source 2)

How can I cover the upper part of my nose to avoid UV radiations?


Answers to comments:

Sunscreen is temporary. Also, inconvenient + need to carry sunscreen bottle + easy to not properly applied it etc. Also given the position, I fear sunscreen may get partially removed when moving neck gaiter or sunglasses. A hat doesn't block reflective UVs.

14
  • 4
    Various glacier glasses I’ve owned have a nose shield to go with the side shields. Google ‘glacier glasses nose shield’
    – Jon Custer
    Jun 26 at 14:30
  • 3
    a bigger hat and sunscreen?
    – njzk2
    Jun 26 at 21:41
  • 2
    How is such a breath-obstructing neck gaiter not more inconvenient than taking a small tube of sunscreen with you, and re-applying it after a while? Jun 27 at 22:47
  • 1
    @leftaroundabout my neck gaiter is not breath-obstructing. Jun 27 at 23:31
  • 3
    How about a strip of sports tape?
    – spuck
    Jun 28 at 17:16
14

As skin cancer is such a major issue in Australia, there is a huge range of products that shield the nose.

From the Australian Cancer Council, see this one which clips onto your sunglasses as an example.

enter image description here

13

Zinc Oxide Paste

Surfers use zinc oxide for the most burnable areas of the face, and it might work for you too.

It's an opaque white paste that totally blocks harmful UV. It's not greasy like sunscreen, and it won't run when you sweat. A little dab on your exposed areas should keep them safe.

Dude in sunglasses with zinc oxide on his face

5
  • 1
    Thanks, the UV-B protection provided by the zinc oxide sounds suboptimal according to ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482794: "Smaller, micronized zinc oxide is considered as a broad-spectrum UV protectant. Although not as efficient in the UVB range as titanium dioxide, this inorganic UV filter covers predominately the UVA spectra, with protection into UVA1. Zinc oxide is also considered inferior as a UV filter to the organic sunscreens.[12]" Jun 26 at 20:41
  • 1
    Don't go with the older lead-based alternative though.
    – pipe
    Jun 26 at 21:49
  • 4
    @FranckDernoncourt I believe that's referring to micronized zinc oxide, which has been broken down into tiny micro- or nano-particles so it will go on clear. It's usually used as one of several active ingredients. What I'm suggesting is non-micronized zinc in at least 25% concentration that stays opaque. It's the stuff in diaper cream (although diaper cream is not FDA approved as sunscreen). Some commercial brands are Surfmud and Zinka (which comes in fun colors).
    – Robert
    Jun 27 at 18:41
  • @Robert Thanks, good point, I think you're right badgerbalm.com/pages/broad-spectrum-uva-sunscreen-protection "Zinc oxide is the only single active ingredient that offers excellent protection from UVA and UVB rays." Do you know why diaper cream is not FDA approved as sunscreen? Jun 27 at 18:44
  • 4
    @FranckDernoncourt Some have additives that would make them less effective or unpleasant (e.g. fish oil), others have insufficient concentration of zinc, and there may be other reasons. But even if they would pass, testing and certification is expensive. If it's not being marketed as a sunscreen it would be a waste. I have used it in the distant past and it seemed to work fine, but now I go for something tested and certified.
    – Robert
    Jun 27 at 19:41
9

Ski goggles. They're made for just that - blocking UV - and allow you to wear prescription glasses underneath.

Did just this on several summer cycling and kayak trips. All day in full sun ones, including pulling into Forks, WA at 95F on the city thermometer after an 80k ride. With glasses. Whatever unpleasantness was going on, the goggles weren't a big part of things. Goggles allow you to limit sunscreen to really your lower face and neck.

Of course, you look like you're from Tatooine, but that's half the fun.

And, no, not advising them for a jog. Or in any activity where you have a lot of up/down sudden acceleration causing them to move around.

3
  • 2
    not all ski goggles fit glasses underneath. You need to find ones specifically designed for that usage. Also, ski goggles tend to keep you warmer that regular sun glasses
    – njzk2
    Jun 26 at 21:42
  • 4
    @njzk2 -- Most ski goggles, these days, do fit over glasses.
    – Martin F
    Jun 27 at 5:12
  • @njzk2 It's pretty easy to see if goggles allow for glasses or not. Try them on. Re. the heat, I specifically gave examples of high-heat/high-exertion usage. Not saying this works for everyone or all cases, but it worked very well for me. YMMV. Jun 30 at 16:15
7

Some face shields also include nose protection, e.g. (mirror):

enter image description here

enter image description here

Another option is using a UV face shield visor, e.g. (mirror):

enter image description here

Good feedback on it in the comment section:

That fancy visor doesn't seem to be practical in a mild windy outdoor environment. – Pere 2 hours ago


Ben Crowell claims most of us don't want to look that silly with a nose guard but I disagree, that looks rather neutral to me:

enter image description here

(image source)


Since comments can be removed rather arbitrarily on Stack Exchange, I'll copy below my warning regarding the use of zinc oxide as UV protection:

The UV-B protection provided by the zinc oxide sounds suboptimal according to https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482794/: "Smaller, micronized zinc oxide is considered as a broad-spectrum UV protectant. Although not as efficient in the UVB range as titanium dioxide, this inorganic UV filter covers predominately the UVA spectra, with protection into UVA1. Zinc oxide is also considered inferior as a UV filter to the organic sunscreens.[12]"

1
  • 2
    Haha, you're the first person who made me laugh today :-)
    – JohnEye
    Jun 28 at 14:22
6

Thinking practically, how about just putting a bandaid on there? Or buying surfer’s sunblock that really sticks for a long time.

1

If you're going to be in an extremely bright environment, such as during all-day glacier travel, then you could consider a plastic shield like the one Rory Alsop describes. They work well. But most of the time, most of us don't want to look that silly or be that uncomfortable and encumbered.

An option that works well for me is to use a chapstick-type product that has a high SPF. It's convenient to carry in a pocket, it doesn't look weird, it doesn't run off when you sweat, and it doesn't get in your eyes.

3
  • 1
    Could you be more specific than "a chapstick-type product"? You know we're looking for detailed, useful answers.
    – Martin F
    Jun 27 at 5:16
  • 2
    @MartinF is that not a brand in your area? It clearly means "lip balm" to me
    – Kat
    Jun 27 at 22:46
  • To me Chapstick is a lip balm to prevent chapped lips in very cold, dry weather. Are there specific products that protect lips -- or noses -- from sunburn? If so, let's hear about them, as per the question ... and per the overall philosophy of this site.
    – Martin F
    Jun 29 at 22:35
1

I would just use a small Band-Aid. Easily removed when no longer needed.

enter image description here

0

With a UV nose guard, as particularly used by mountaineers. There are lots on the market, expensively, just search for them.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.