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This is something I use around the house, camping, tying down misc truck loads, etc. It’s a quick way to attach a carabiner to a bight, it can take load on the working, standing or both ends, it doesn’t slip & it breaks easily - even after heavily loaded. I’m not confident enough to trust my life to it (some might call it a “Yugo Knot”… You Go First), but it hasn’t failed me thus far. It’s somewhere between a Bull Hitch & a sideways Lark’s Head, that clips in like a Munter. Images below show the finished FRONT view, process and dressed BACK view. ID? Pros? Cons? enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

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  • Are you familiar with the International Guild of Knot Tyers? They do have people that check knots for being new and will provide name(s) if not new.
    – Willeke
    Jun 15, 2023 at 4:13
  • What do you intend to use the knot for? And do you always tie it in the middle of a rope?
    – PMF
    Jun 15, 2023 at 18:43

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This appears to be the Single Hook Hitch (ABOK #1886), of course by then intended for hooks, not carabiners, and therefore in the chapter about about hitches on hooks (the whale icon designates it as "probably original", i.e., to seamanship). The following comment accompanies its description:

It ties and casts off easily and holds well when fast to a large hook. It should not be tied, however, in a large rope that overflows the hook.

It is equivalent to the Pile Hitch, ABOK #1815, where instead of a hook/carabiner you tie it onto a topologically equivalent tip of a pole or stake.

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