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On the team first attempt of a climb with no prior information (because we had gotten off published-route) I was the lead climber on the pitch through the crux. I managed to make it through without falling or loading the belay; but only by placing a cam and climbing the cam; thus we said "class 6" which is an aid climb in the Yosemite system.

This was still a team first attempt with no information; and the hardest thing attempted by the team at the time. I am not embarrassed to say the route is a 5.0; and I would have had an on-sight except for my lack of climbing skill required me to climb the gear. (I'm convinced what it boils down to is the cam placement eats up the hand placement; and that wouldn't be necessary if the cam were not there; but it's just too much exposure to not place it. I have since managed to redpoint the route though it held out long after harder routes fell.)

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    I think that would just be onsight A0 1 piece, if you want to be precise. However, onsight is a terminology from sport climbing, not mountaineering or alpine climbing. The same goes for free climbing. Most mountaineering ascents will not have checked out the route before and in mountaineering, people are also a lot more liberal with aiding at the crux sections. Only few people would turn around in a 300m wall because they failed to free climb a 5m crux section.
    – Manziel
    Commented Jun 11 at 11:14

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if you are aiding an A5/A5+, I think being 'alive' is the onsight adjacent. source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boQHYBhlOcs (aid climbing rant)

in your case you climbed 5.0 C0, C0 because you placed a cam and pulled on it, if you left the came forever it would be A0 but we can assume you "C"leaned the cam. This also assumes you free climbed a move that was 5.0 at some point on the route

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    You misinterpret the ratings. I had to go look up A0-A5 after the comment. I am still using Yosemite ratings.
    – Joshua
    Commented Jun 11 at 17:37
  • hey Joshua, yes my response was a bit sardonic however I just wanted to inform you that A grades are used in Yosemite. Essentially youll see C grades for clean aid and A grades for the combination of both use of hammer and fear/danger hence my comment about A5. On El Cap, "Tribal Rite" is A3+, which means youre very scared and the hammer is out.
    – Kevin Crum
    Commented Jun 12 at 16:53
  • I don't doubt the A grades are used in Yosemite; however Yosemite rating system is something else. 5.0 is the lowest possible technical climb rating, and 6.0 is the lowest possible aid rating.
    – Joshua
    Commented Jun 12 at 17:14
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    Be aware that the Yosemite system does not really make sense. It assumes that free and aid climbs are totally different things. In practice, people will free climb some sections of aid climbs for the simple fact that free easy climbing is so much faster than aiding. So in practice, people will give the mandatory free climbing grade with the aid grade, e.g. 5.8 A2
    – Manziel
    Commented Jun 14 at 7:12
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    Also be aware that C-rating can be ambiguous. It is not only used as an equivalent of the A rating with easily removable pieces, but also as a rating for the protection quality on free climbs, with C1 being lots of good placements and C3 being rather dangerous. Probably not common in Yosemite but I have seen this in multiple guidebooks for the alps
    – Manziel
    Commented Jun 14 at 7:21

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