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I have been walking/running/hiking in my huaraches for about half a year now and have worn through 3 pairs of laces. I have been using accessory cord used in climbing as lacing material, since it has a high tensile rating, but it doesn't seem to be very abrasion-resistant. On my current pair of huaraches I have moved the side-holes outward a bit, which minimizes wear at those points, but the knot underneath the sole is still very vulnerable. What other lacing-materials are there that might last a bit longer?

As requested, I uploaded images of the huaraches and their current laces.

Laced for long distance trail run The worn knot


Side-note: For anyone interested in learning a good way to tie huaraches for long distance running visit this website for a great video tutorial.

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    Seems like leather would be better than cords. Leather is what was used originally. The problem with cords is that they're made from countless tiny strands that are easily cut by abrasive surfaces. Jan 26 '13 at 14:38
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    Can you post photos of your huaraches and their current laces? That would be awesome. Jan 29 '13 at 21:46
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    Theoretically UHMWPE (Spectra, Dyneema) should be a top choice, being one of the most abrasion resistant polymers, and following the logic of Don's comment the thicker the individual fiber the better.
    – Mr.Wizard
    Jan 30 '13 at 6:27
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    @DudeOnRock: Tandy Leather is a good place. (tandyleatherfactory.com/en-usd/home/locations/storesearch.aspx) The closest ones to you appear to be San Bruno or Union City. Jan 30 '13 at 20:10
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    wow - didn't realise you could use these for anything other than relaxing by the pool. Very cool!
    – Rory Alsop
    Jan 30 '13 at 22:24
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I do believe that what Don Branson said in the comments is very much right on the money.

I have a friend whom have worked with leather for quite some time now and according to him, a round leather lace should be the best approach if you want something with more staying power than a normal braided string.

PS. Just remember to keep those leather laces in good condition by greasing them regularly.

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