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I am considering climbing Mt. Triglav in late September and am torn between the Via Ferrata routes or the less strenuous hiking trails.

Can anyone provide advice on the following -

  • Accomodation
  • Route Choice
  • Airport Transfers
  • Equipment / Clothing
  • 2
    Did you end up doing the climb? – ShemSeger Dec 5 '14 at 21:31
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    @ShemSeger I did, the local paper and my organisation covered it in detail. I will be blogging about it in a few days and Urban Times will also cover the story. I walked into the National Park from a local town using the network of accommodation huts and began ascending on the second day. The climb is quite treacherous without via Ferrata kit although approximately half of us were in simple hiking gear (without hard hats, ropes, belays or via Ferrata harnesses). The danger was evident when I had to help secure a girl at the summit for a helilift who had broken her arm. – Venture2099 Dec 27 '14 at 7:04
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    All in all Triglav is accessible, cheap and a fantastic experience with stunning views and exposure. – Venture2099 Dec 27 '14 at 7:05
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    @Venture2099: Glad that you completed the climb. May be you can frame an answer from your experiences there. It would be great and helpful. – WedaPashi Jun 15 '15 at 18:46
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Triglav (2,864 m; 9,396 feet) is the highest mountain in Slovenia/Europe and is a part of "Julian Alps." The season when there's no snow on it and when the mountain houses are open is only July-August or, maybe, June-September.

If you come with the plane, you have about 60 kilometers by bus from Ljubljana Jože Pučnik Airport to the mountain house "Aljažev dom" at the end of the Vrata valley at the bottom of the mountain (at about 1,000 m). You can eat and sleep there.

Aljažev dom

Aljažev dom with Triglav behind it (source: Wikipedia.org, Creative Commons licence)

You need about 8 hours - by one of the 3 routes:

  • "Čez prag" - the easiest
  • "Tominškova pot" - a "normal" via ferrata route (pictures)
  • "Bambergova pot" - the hardest route with most climbing (pictures, pictures)

There is a forest at the bottom and plain rocks higher up. You don't need any ropes or other special equipment, except maybe a helmet. If sunny, a T-shirt may be enough, but it's always good to have a jumper and something against wind in a backpack, because the local weather can change quickly. It's a good idea to start early, let's say about 5 a.m. to avoid walking under a hot sun. Also, avoid Saturdays and Sundays, because it can be really crowdy then. It's usually done as a two-day hike.

There are other, more gradual, routes on the other sides of the mountain, for example, via Triglav Lakes Valley, which you can use on the way down. Another route is via Velo Polje.

Triglav

Triglav - the access from Velo Polje (Image source: Environmentandsociety.org, Creative Commons)

You do not need any official (or other) guide and there are no fees to pay. If you decide to sleep in a mountain house, the cheapest is the one at the bottom (Aljažev dom). Food is much cheaper if you buy it in a store in some town.

  • Do you know by any chance how the Ferratas on Triglav compare to those on Mangart, especially the Slovenian Ferrata? I found the latter not difficult but sometimes very exposed. – henning May 14 at 12:23
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    The Bamberg route on Triglav is very exposed and it's meant for more experienced hikers. Tominškova is also exposed at times. But it's a solid rock on both and they are very well secured, and not nearly as annoying as the Slovenian route on Mangart (the problem there is the sand and lack of steel ropes). "Čez prag" is easy. – Jan May 14 at 12:38
  • thanks, that's very helpful! Yes, the lack of steel ropes in some sections was the annoying part. Instead of sand, we encountered quite a bit of slippery wet rock. – henning May 14 at 13:41

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