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When people discuss Acclimatization, it is generally observed that they refer to higher altitudes, or colder weather.

While, acclimatization is not only applicable to higher altitudes and/or cold weather.

I live in India, I am used to at living at atmospheric temperature of close to 40 oC. So, assuming that I have a good health, I am a seasoned hiker, its not much of a survival task for me if I am to walk in Gobi Desert for a couple of days. Difficult, Hell yes, Survival, No, absolutely not that serious.

If I was a Norwegian, it would take me extra efforts and preparation to something like that. Reason, Hot weather.

Getting used to with Hot weather is also an acclimatization process.

How can I acclimatize to hot weather?

  • Sports teams also train in hot locations prior to big sporting events in hotter climes to help acclimatize, they don't just rock up and enter the event :) good question! – Aravona Oct 16 '15 at 15:21
  • A downvote? Care to explain why this isn't a valid question? – WedaPashi Oct 21 '15 at 12:33
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I'd typically go about it in two scenarios, not just the heat alone.

  • Hot + Humid, Typical Example: Coastal regions of India, Sri Lanka, Caribbean Islands.
  • Hot + Dry, Examples, Deserts.

In both the cases, the thing to keep an eye on is Sweating.

If weather is dry, hot and low humidity, you will stop sweating after a certain point, the core temperature is increases, and you might sustain a heat stroke if continued without necessary hydration.
If the weather is hot and humid, you will sweat a lot, loose body fluids and start dehydrating.

Key to avoid both of them is Hydration.

People who spend a great deal of time outdoors become "outdoor acclimatized." These persons are affected less by heat or cold extremes because their bodies have adjusted to the outdoor environments, says Dr. G. Edgar Folk, physiology professor in the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.

  1. Hydrating at regular shorter and regular intervals. Hydrating at regular intervals is not the actual Acclimatization. But, Hydrating at shorter and regular is necessary in order to sustain Acclimatization Routine. You don't sit in a tent the whole day to Acclimatize. You have to work out, might have to modify diet and the hydrating habit that suits the altitude/weather.
  2. Working out outdoors regularly during the Acclimatization Period.
  3. Before getting out there, before the acclimatization period begins, There’s also the option of creating an artificial hot and/or humid environment by wearing extra clothing during exercise, training in a hot room or without the Air Conditioners, using a humidifier, etc.
  4. Plasma plays a role in Thermoregulation and Osmoregulation. Add protein supplements and protein drinks to your diet, A protein-heavy diet will help to build more plasma in your blood. Also, consume fruits rich with Vitamin C regularly to increase the Ascorbic Acid that is a vital part of blood plasma.
  5. Once you are out there, wear looser clothes, light-colored cloths. Again, this isn't Acclimatization, but it is necessary to be able to perform in that kind of a weather.

A proper Acclimatization routine should last ranging from for a week to about 10-12 days.

  • How is hydrating, wearing loose clothes a part of acclimatization? – Ricketyship Oct 26 '15 at 8:59
  • @Unsung: Through the acclimatization (to heat) the body can achieve a reduction in the loss of water and electrolytes from the kidneys (Refer: Training, acclimatization and heat tolerance by S. Robinson, Edition: 1967). During the Acclimatization, You train yourself to adapt to weather (Heat, specifically for this post). At higher altitudes, for example, you do load-ferries up the mountain and come down, you exercise, just to make sure that the body copes up with the weather. Thats how they are related. And, Welcome back :) – WedaPashi Oct 26 '15 at 9:45
  • Again, I didn't get the correlation. Are you training your body to retain water by drinking more? Eg, if I stay in Bangalore India(cooler place) and keep drinking a lot of water before going to say Rajasthan(a desert), will my body cope better because I've been drinking a lot of fluids? Hydrating at regular intervals is not an acclimatization activity according to me. It's a necessity in specific environments. – Ricketyship Oct 26 '15 at 11:27
  • @Unsung: "if I stay in Bangalore India(cooler place) and keep drinking a lot of water before going to say Rajasthan(a desert), will my body cope better because I've been drinking a lot of fluids?" I tend to agree, but am not sure. Though, had that been "if I've stayed in Bangalore India (cooler place) for years and now have moved to say Rajasthan(a desert), and I have started drinking more water than I used to when I was in Bangalore, will my body cope better?", I'd say definitely Yes! – WedaPashi Oct 26 '15 at 12:59
  • Again, I repeat, I didn't say, Hydrating at regular intervals is Acclimatization. I did say, Hydrating at regular intervals is necessary in order to sustain Acclimatization Routine. You don't sit in a tent the whole day to Acclimatize. You have to work out, might have to modify diet that suits the altitude/weather. Why do you think People in Nagpur (a hotter place) consume a lot of Oranges than any other city in Maharashtra? Thats sustenance, not Acclimatization. – WedaPashi Oct 26 '15 at 13:05

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