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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 7995

Anything on backpacks, as a piece of equipment, its maintenance, modifications and tricks.

8
votes
In general I'd agree with Liam's answer that you should strap your gear onto the bike using a rack and/or panniers. On smooth terrain I'd take this route every time. The one time I'd disagree is if y …
answered Feb 16 '16 by Erik
6
votes
The real range of answers is only limited by your imagination. There are an innumerable amount of things you can do with a spare bit of cordage. One use that I can see for it in your picture is as a r …
answered Jul 11 '17 by Erik
21
votes
With a dash of common sense, and a modicum of skill I'd say packs are safe on a chairlift. One winter I skied over 100 days at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. I wore a pack the vast majority of those da …
answered Dec 15 '16 by Erik
5
votes
It looks like the webbing for the sternum strap is similar size to the webbing for the shoulder strap. In this pack you could unthread the left side of the sternum strap buckle (keeping the snap buckl …
answered Dec 1 '15 by Erik
6
votes
If you are in a wooded area you can always hang your pack in a tree like you would to avoid bears eating your food at night. There are two advantages to this approach. The pack won't be messed with …
answered Feb 19 '16 by Erik