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After a bit of digging I found this, which covers some in Europe (not extensively as I first thought!) It's worth pointing out that while for some (and probably most people here) wild camping means free-camping wandering around with a tent and supplies on foot, for many others it can mean driving around and parking up somewhere in a motor home. I refer to ...


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It's allowed in Sweden. It's called Allemansrätten.


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Generally in England and Wales it is illegal to wild camp anywhere without prior permission from the land owner. Although some UK national parks are more tolerant than others!! In my experience certainly in the English and Welsh national parks it is tolerated as long as you are not seen and you leave no trace including not starting any fires. For more ...


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This is a pure theory, if you're asking about permission... you have to understand that the rules and laws are set up for people that park 3 cars, make 5 big tents, lot of noise and leave a lot of rubish. Practically, when you are a good outdoor person, quiet and never leaving any rubish behind you, and you need just sleep for one night somewhere with just a ...


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Access to climbing areas is an ongoing issue in many climbing areas. In the United States for example, it is claimed that 1 in 5 climbing areas is threatened by an access issue. There are many funds, societies, and advocacy groups who work on behalf of climbers to protect public access to climbing areas, to keep them open to the public for recreational ...


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In Scotland, it is allowed, with conditions. Wild camping in Scotland One restriction that I know of is that camping is not allowed on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond. There are likely to be restrictions during the hunting season as well, there are phone lines where you can find out about hunting activities.


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Often in British countryside you'll find fields with horses in (and cows and much of this is applicable to bovine) where it is unavoidable or rather difficult to go a different way and the are a few things to be aware of. Usually you'll be heading over something similar to this: As public rights of way here allow footpaths through any field, garden, park, ...


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I don't know how this is in other countries, but here in Austria you usually don't cross a fenced area but rather walk around it. As a horse owner myself I also wouldn't want any stranger wandering in the fields where my horse is. Horses are flight animals and therefore they usually flee from any unknown or suspicious things. But domestic horses could ...


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In Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Poland You can camp almost anywhere in forest and near public waters. Latvia is forest country, and You can camp almost anywhere. There are no restrictions. If the land owner doesn't want to allow it, he must place a sign. There are restrictions on national parks only. In national parks it's allowed in specific places only, but ...


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Some answers: 1 - British Canoeing is an excellent website for this sort of thing. 2 - It would be acceptable to use a sea kayak. 3 - Completely depends on your kayak. For a quick temporary repair, you may be able to get away with a patch and glue (costing about £5) but you'd be better off with cloth tape and fibreglass resin if you have the time to let ...


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Here is a good summary of the legal position of swimming in the UK www.river-swimming.co.uk/legal.htm I think the opening line is most interesting "The right to swim is a complex issue which, in many cases, is undetermined." and I think that this forms the basis of my answer which is... Go for a swim wherever you fancy (apart from the areas listed ( ...


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It is very safe to walk alone in England. The standard walks will have lots of others walking along them. Wild camping is frowned upon in many places. Procedures: leaving gates as you find them. Carrying your rubbish to a dustbin. Look in the right direction when crossing a road. On roads, walk facing the traffic. In the countryside you should say "Hello" ...


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It is generally illegal in Denmark. You may sleep on all beaches, but you are not allowed to pitch a tent on beaches. In some state-forrests you may camp where you like. More than 1.000 primitive campsites are scattered around the country. Most are free - some cost 1-3 euro pr. night. They may just be a lawn but some have shelters, firewood and access to ...


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4 - In Scotland, you have a general right of access under the Scottish Outdoor Access Code. This applies to just about all land and inland waters, and allows non-motorised recreation and passage. So this includes kayaking and canoeing on rivers, lochs and canals. These rights are dependent on being responsible, eg avoid disturbing other people or damaging ...


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The answer is usually no, but there may be some restrictions depending on exactly where you're going. Most logging roads are on crown land. The use of forest roads is managed through road abandonment, road decommissioning (making it impassable) and road access controls (i.e. signage, gates, etc.). In Ontario, public access to Crown land is restricted for a ...


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Here in the US, "horses in a field" would imply the field is fenced. That means you should stay out. There is one exception, which is if you know the land is public property and it's OK to walk on it. This is often the case with cattle on BLM and Forest Service land in the western US. In that case, there will be fences with gates, or roads crossing ...


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I think that it is easier to keep access, than to get it back, so I will start with that. Always follow Leave No Trace and make certain that your activities do not create any eyesores. Volunteer to help pickup after other people and clean up the trash they leave. Protect the reputation of the climbing community, always be safe and do not hesitate to speak ...


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The other answers address your question pretty well but I think you might have jumped in a bit head-first with your research and that maybe the question that you should be asking is "What's the best way of getting into kayaking" The best thing to do is go find your local club - it's by far the safest, cheapest, friendliest and most effective way of ...


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Some extra info about France. In general, wild camping is forbidden in France, except when stated otherwise. As any other country, France has a number of regional and national natural parks, where "bivouac" (setting up your tent after 7pm and packing it back before 8am) might be allowed. Regulations are specific to each park, and you should get to know it ...


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As a supplement to Martin Hugi's excellent answer I would add that there will likely be groups of people locally with an interest in outdoor swimming, and they will know all the best spots. In my area there is a Facebook Group, a website with a detailed guide and map, and a couple of bloggers who write up their swims with details of temperature and ...


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Additional for Greece: I'm a wild camper for many years in Greece. I have never any issue with locals or police.. Ok, I am careful in general but I guess also lucky. :) Yes, it is illegal and you must know where to go. The best is to ask the locals, or other campers that you will find there. As a general rule, after sunset you wont have any issue putting ...


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There's quite a good guide I've found on wild camping in the UK here: Wild Camping. In general, there's more acceptance than you'd expect from simply reading the laws, if you show respect. In Scotland, the law is different to the rest of the UK. Generally you're allowed to camp on the majority of unenclosed land if you follow a (sensible) code of conduct. ...


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Romania: I have some experiences here, and I can say that wild camping is permitted, unless it is someone's land surrounded by a fence, however loose or abandoned it may seem (although in Romania you can never know who owns which patch of land, but mostly it is safe and fine). There are plenty of good places for wild camping, especially if you get a bit away ...


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It's legal to camp almost everywhere in the Czech and Slovak Republics except national parks. You are not allowed to make a campfire closer than 50 m from the forest. Although there is a small risk of being fined.


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Don't even think about wild camping in Italy. In most cities it is illegal, and more important it is highly dangerous. Depending on the area, you may be mugged, raped, stabbed, or flash flooded by a torrent of mud.


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In Serbia it is legal and everywhere is free.


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I can only answer for Switzerland. It's legal to "wildcamp" and most ground belongs to Farmers which can be asked anytime, and most of them will let you pitch your tent. For more information see the following links (in German/French): Campieren & Biwakieren Biwakieren Verbotsliste


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Great answer from QuentinUK. I would add that you should be aware that although you do have access rights on footpaths, many of them go through private land. Some land owners maintain routes and signs better than others, but if they have made the effort follow the path as best you can. Sometimes these routes are for getting you across safely (especially ...


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