15

There is no documented scientific relationship between individual blood pressure and AMS. Furthermore, your guide appears to be completely mis-informed as to the mechanics of AMS. The most common symptom of AMS - a roaring headache - is caused by swelling of the brain as the body attempts to make up for reduced oxygen in the blood by pumping harder and ...


12

The other answers already gave lots of information about altitude adaption, so I will focus on one certain point: AMS (acute mountain sickness) evolves when staying at high altitudes. It is a pathologic disease with potential severe consequences. This should not be mixed up with the immediate influences of high altitude on the body like decrease of physical ...


11

I could not find evidence of an existing test and there is no widely accepting known cause. The only risk factor commonly noted is having been previously affected by AMS. Other mentioned risk factors include: anemia preexisting heart or lung disease However I found one article about a study done by a subgroup of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). in ...


10

Here is a clip from this webpage - Acclimatization To Altitude: Preparing for Competition at Altitude How can athletes who live at sea level prepare for a competition at altitude? One approach is to compete within 24 hours of arrival at altitude. Not much acclimatization will have taken place but most of the classical symptoms of altitude ...


9

Yes, he can get it again and in fact people with a history of altitude sickness have a higher risk of getting it again. Risk factors for altitude illness include rapid ascent, strenuous physical exertion, young age, living at a low altitude, and a history of altitude illness. Altitude Illness: Risk Factors, Prevention, Presentation, and Treatment If you ...


8

You are right, if you gain 3000+ meters within 6 hours, you are susceptible to AMS. A safe vertical height gain per day would be around 1000 meters. But since your question is more about what other symptoms to watch out for to identify AMS, here are a few that you can keep an eye on: Nausea. Dizziness. Loss of appetite(But at higher altitudes, this can be a ...


8

This is really funny because I am from Toronto (Sea Level) and flew to Denver a couple months ago and climbed Bierstadt the morning after arriving followed by Quandary Peak the next day. Upon arriving in Denver I drove to sleep at 10,000ft then woke up early and climbed Bierstadt. Will the effects and onset of altitude sickness exacerbated by the short ...


7

By 'faint' you mean the person lost consciousness or was it just weakness? I was in a similar position but not that severe. I was in the wrong assumption that I was acclimatizing fine because I was the strongest in the group during that time. I felt great, no headache or nausea or anything at all on the acclimatization mountains up to 4500m. On the summit ...


7

I guess one of the central concerns with AMS is that you can never know when it hits you. You can prepare, acclimatize and try to avoid all the stupid mistakes - but even under perfect conditions, and even if you have a successful history of climbing at altitude it can hit you any time. From what you described I don't see any obvious mistakes. It sound like ...


7

Many people at moderate altitudes (about 10,000-13,000', 3000-4000 m) experience mild AMS (acute mountain sickness). The most common symptom is a headache. Mild AMS is not life-threatening, and people may experience similar symptoms due to other factors that are common in a mountain environment, such as lack of sleep, caffeine withdrawal, sunburn, or ...


7

The answers given already address almost all the issues well, but I'd like to add one final point which hasn't been given enough focus; ease of descent in case something goes wrong. If the OP's sister arrives, makes it up, and comes down before the AMS symptoms begin, that's great. But if something goes wrong and she's stuck at 4000+ meters, she is in some ...


7

Here is a reliable medical source of the causes, symptoms and advised medical responses for altitude sickness of varying degrees. Cleveland Clinic - Altitude Sickness information Altitude Sickness Explanation Altitude sickness can affect anyone who goes to high altitudes without giving the body time to adjust to the changes in air pressure and oxygen level. ...


6

If it's a nice summer's day at lowest avalanche warning level in mid altitude you can still be hit by an avalanche and die. That being said in reference to the answer of @BenCrowell and the comments, it's just a matter of chances which are relatively low to get AMS (which are effecting your body in a serious matter) in regions up to 3000 m or even slightly ...


5

Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) is the name for a group of conditions that arise from the affects of altitude on the body. (source) The time for these conditions to develop varies and are influenced by many factors. The symptoms your group member experienced are most likely came from an acute lack of oxygen supply to the brain. This would generally be called ...


5

As a speculation, you may have a ceiling of about 16,500 feet. This speculation is reinforced by your starting to feel stronger as you passed 16,500 on the way down. Was this the first time you climbed above 16,500? My husband had an office mate -- very tough, fit guy -- who puked regularly at 13,000 feet, and felt awful. Finally he accepted his ceiling....


4

As a general rule: Assume acute mountain sickness (AMS) unless proven otherwise. AMS is potentially life threatening, so if you have symptoms related to AMS, do not ascend any further. If they do not get better, descend. Low altitude is not an indication against AMS which can occur above 2000m already. So the assessment should rely on your symptoms. Early ...


4

As your body gets used to the altitude, the symptoms go away. Therefore, if symptoms persist, Yes you should be worried. Altitude sickness can affect your lungs and brain. When this happens, symptoms include being confused, not being able to walk straight (ataxia), feeling faint, and having blue or gray lips or fingernails. When you breathe, you may hear a ...


4

There isn't much difference in the two "acclimatization" options. In neither option do you get more than a start on acclimatization. In both options, you serve notice on your body to get ready. Option 2 might be "safer" in that your chances for a good night's sleep and a good dinner are better at the hotel than the hut. Thus, you might start the climb ...


2

I would think not. AMS is caused by lower atmospheric pressure which in turn reduces the number of O2 molecules you get to breathe in. Your own personal blood pressure has nothing to do with the number of O2 molecules available to breathe.


2

10,000 feet is not very high. Most likely the headache you were experiencing was due to some combination of sleep deprivation, caffeine withdrawal, and unaccustomed exertion and aerobic challenge. It would be unusual to experience any discomfort whatsoever at that altitude. Most people don't need any acclimatization for that altitude. I've hiked with a lot ...


1

I have low blood pressure, 90/60 read to me just one week prior to going mountain hiking in Palm Springs California (8,500 ft. elevation). I did not experience the tiredness or lack of oxygen I thought that I would. I seemed to have the same energy as I usually have without any adverse symptoms associated to what many would complain as thinner air at that ...


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