14

Have you tried Dock Leaves? They're well known as a way of soothing Nettle stings and might help.


11

Normal detergent should be able to break down the poisonous oils in question, it shouldn't require any specialist stuff to remove them. Just be sure of a few things: Wash infected clothes separate from "clean" (i.e. unaffected) ones to eliminate any possible risk of spreading Make especially sure you don't overload the machine - leave plenty of room so the ...


10

I have researched this occasionally over the years. Ivy Block, Tecnu, and Ivarest all have preventative lotions. The oil may still spread, but it is a good first step. As an alternative, the forest service has recommended spray deodorant as well. The active ingredient, aluminum chlorohydrate, may prevent absorption by blocking pores, just as it does to ...


9

I use both cortisone and benedryl cream. One reduces swelling, the other reduces the allergic reaction. Make sure to only use water soluble creams! Petroleum based lotions will block the skin from naturally expunging the poison ivy oil.


8

"Get out as fast as possible" doesn't make sense considering you are "hours or days" from a trailhead. If the allergic reaction is going to kill you, like swelling up your throat to the point you can't breath, it's going to happen within about 20 minutes. If you have someone in your party with such alergies, it is imperative you bring medications to deal ...


7

Benadryl cream works about as good as anything for me.


7

I have a similar extreme reaction, so this is what I have learned: Tecnu works pretty well after you have been exposed, but before the rash develops (I realize that is a pretty short window of opportunity). It can also help to stop the oils from spreading. It works by washing the oils off of your skin, and it works better than soap and water, which can ...


7

The problem could be caused by an allergy to drying additives in climbing chalk; that's what caused my problem. I had been using a prefilled chalk ball in my outdoor climbing chalk bag, and when I switched to pure chalk (pure magnesium carbonate) the problem went away. It was hard to discover that my chalk was the culprit, because I don't have this problem ...


7

The poison ivy plant itself is not what makes people itch. It's an oil called urushiol, which is inside the leaves, stems and roots of the plants. That's why some of the sources I quote below use the word urushiol, as that's the technical term for what causes the reaction. Most of the research I found indicates that between 15% and 25% of people are ...


6

I don't know how rare resistance is, but it seems the real question is about resistance coming and going. Yes, resistance can come and go for individuals over their lifetime. Exposure, or long periods of non-exposure, can make a difference, but the result seems to not be predictable. Most anecdotes are from people that were, or thought they were, ...


6

A quick search turned up these possibilities: Jaybird & Mais Sports Medicine Adhesive Tape (non-stretch) Many of the products say: Hypo-allergenic and 100% Latex Free This is not specifically described as climbing tape but the first product, EX1 JAYBIRD® ONE TAPE, says: "Our strongest everyday strapping tape product. EX1 is manufactured using a higher ...


5

I realize that an answer has already been chosen, but as a frequent sufferer of poison ivy, I feel obliged to answer. The best way to treat poison ivy, is to not get it in the first place, with avoidance as the first step, but a blocker works as well. The best blocker I've found is IvyBlock, which is a lotion. However, I am more likely to use IvyX which ...


4

There are no creams that will prevent poison ivy. Avoidance and long clothes are best. One thing you can do is wash it off. Usually if you catch it within a couple of hours, you can scrub off the oil on your skin with soap and water and a washcloth. You can't see the oil, but it seems to require about the same amount of scrubbing as if you were scrubbing ...


4

One summer job, I needed shoes to walk on a rocky beach, sometimes in the water, for 5 to 10 miles per day all summer. Stretchy neoprene shoes were terrible for this- no traction and no support. So I used regular sneakers. I chose a pair of cross country racing flats. The model I used are no longer made, but were made by New Balance. The uppers were ...


4

Two suggestions. Buy canvas sneakers or tennis shoes, or even those flat soled kungfu shoe style slippers. Leather boat shoes.


4

This is what I've found in the wonderful world of the internets: http://www.buildablock.com/blog/poisonous-plants-to-avoid-in-north-america Personal experience living in the USA for 22 years says that there are more issues with thorn bushes than with stinging nettles. Most poisonous plants I've run into are low to the ground. If you wear pants (and are not ...


3

I make my own laundry soap. I just found out that fels naptha soap found at walmart in the laundry isle is the best to use for the oils left on material items. Try it it works great and i save tons of money. Just grate the soap and mix with borax and washing powder. If you like you can also put in crystals. I use purex. 2 tsp in the wash cycle and WOW!


3

Plantain weed not to be confused with the bannana like fruit.Crush the leaves and rub it on.It is usually growing on the edge of roadways or compacted trails.


3

Jewelweed should do the job, if you have it locally. It usually grows close to the poison ivy.


3

I believe ice can help. It's a local anesthetic, reduces swelling, and closes the pores, keeping the poison out. Of course, it can be hard to find ice..


2

I'm not going to repeat any of the good advice given in earlier answers. However, creams, lotions and salves will not work if you have a massive case of poison ivy. Then there is nothing to do but go to your doctor or to a walk-in clinic and get a prednisone shot and/or tablets. I had a horrible case of poison ivy many years ago -- hands, arms, legs, ...


1

Know how to identify it and avoid. that is the only way. Long pants and socks will help, but if you get it on them and use your hands in contact, surprise .. and then ... Homeopathic remedies sound fun but the only way to over come poison ivy is with the expensive soaps that enzymatically break down urushiol oil, the oil that causes the irritation. ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible