25

Yes it does, especially mobile phones. I attended an avalanche course last year. The guide did a very simple demonstration. He powered his avalanche beacon on "send" mode, and put it on his backpack over the snow surface. All participants walked away from his beacon in a straight line with their own beacons in "search" mode. We all marked in the snow the ...


24

On the right snow, you can ascend extremely steep (even if it probably isn't the most economical thing to do) - so from that aspect, I don't see a problem. Looking at the skiers center of gravity, it doesn't seem to be off by far either. I estimated the center of gravity at the red dot. If the weight was mainly on the back leg, the current orientation would ...


21

I agree that the mountains in the background look weird, but the crop is so close that it's hard to tell for certain without additional context. This image appears to be from an article on skinning up steep slopes, and states that the skier is on a 34 degree slope: http://straightchuter.com/steep-skinning-technique/ Given that Chris Figenshau appears to be ...


15

The optimal skin track angle is a subject of much debate in the backcountry skiing world. There are generally two schools of thought on skin tracks. The steeper the better Slow and steady wins the race Since you used "effective" rather than possible, my 2 cents would be that you should set the steepest skin track that allows you to climb at a consistent ...


14

I am the lead hardware engineer for Backcountry Access. Interference from personal electronic devices (PED) is very real, and it can range anywhere from minimal impact to severe. The reasons are a little complicated to understand, but basically the worst case is if the PED emits a signal at or very close to 457kHz, which is the beacon frequency. LED ...


14

Given that your avalanche beacon has the potential to be your partner's lifeline (or your own), it makes sense to protect it. Rocks, branches, skis, poles, ice tools, there's a lot that could potentially damage this important piece of equipment before you even enter avalanche terrain. In the event of an avalanche, it's not just the pressure of snow on ...


11

In my opinion the best would be to have a couple of more advanced friends who are able to teach or even know guides or groups and go with them for fun and to learn. Unfortunately I am not having this opportunity (yet?). How that, when you are already a member of the DAV? It is first and foremost an club of mountain enthusiasts, not a provider of insurance ...


11

6 of one, half dozen of another. A lot comes down to how easy it is to hike in the ski boots you are using. The problem with hiking is that it only takes a short stretch of unpacked trail to lose any gain in time and you can't take advantage of any brief downhill stretches. Even with skins you can get a bit of glide. On the other hand, if the trail has ...


11

It cannot be that the image is rotated, and that this rotation is the only alteration to the image. The reason is simple: look at the straps of the backpack. They are hanging vertically, and they are aligned with the vertical axis of the image. Essentially, they give us a "plumb line". If the image had been rotated, that detail would have to have been ...


10

I believe the answer to your specific question is no; the only boots I know of with tech fittings are hard boots made of plastic or carbon fiber. However, I think you may be underestimating those boots. AT boots are hard plastic but can still offer a soft feel. Transitioning to skinning uphill consists of not just unlocking the heels but also switching ...


9

There are two different norms for ski bindings (and their release characteristics): ISO 9462 for alpine ski bindings and ISO 13992 for touring ski bindings. The former is tested together with alpine boots/soles (ISO 5355), the latter with touring boots (ISO 9523), which are bent and have rubber. I assume you are not mixing the boots and bindings of either ...


9

I just wanted to give my input as an avid backcountry skier and general ski bum during the winters. As mentioned above, the straps seem like a pretty good indicator that the picture is real. Even if he was moving, skining up a slope is a pretty smooth movement that wouldn't disturb the straps much. If there was any wind then there is a low chance that the ...


8

There are two basic designs for bindings for ski-touring: tech/Pin bindings and frame bindings. All examples given are not a generally representative sample as they base on my experience here in Switzerland, where Diamir and Dynafit dominate the market with a recent increase in marker bindings (but mostly in freeriding). Frame Bindings These are similar to ...


7

I think I've gone straight up 30° on good snow, maybe steeper for short bits. This would be on old Diamir bindings and fairly stiff alpine boots. As Dakatine mentioned, not all snow is equal, powder tends to let the tails drop even further than the actual slope. So loose snow, presence of hard ice are a problem, and of course you'll also want full length ...


6

The answer to this question at its most basic level is generally use your ski crampons until you would feel more safe using boot crampons. I suspect since you asked this question you aren't very experienced with ski crampons and/or boot crampons so I'm going to talk a little bit about their use cases. Ski crampons are only used when ascending, and used in ...


6

What you might want to look at getting are some randonee boots and some Dynafit bindings. They're designed more for racing up ski hills than they are coming down, but still do a good job on the quick descent. Randonee Boots: They aren't super soft, you're never going to get the control you want on the down hill with super soft boots alpine boots, you'd be ...


6

The picture in the answer to that question you referred to here doesn't have a source listed for attribution. To me, however, it does look like the same picture as the one in the answer to the question that ShemSeger suggested as a duplicate. That answer attributes the picture to a site called Straightchuter, which gives the name of the person who made ...


6

What you did is not uncommon. Randonee racers fold their skins in half and stick them to themselves all the time. The mesh cheat sheets work great at prolonging the life of the glue on your skins, but they aren't 100% necessary. I ski with people who for years have only ever stuck their skins to themselves, and aside from some pitting of the glue, their ...


5

The short answer is tech binding compatible boots will work fine with non-tech AT bindings in the vast majority of circumstances. The more involved answer is (as always for safety gear) to check the specific manufacturer recommendations for a specific boot/binding combination. Here is a quote to support that: MOST AT boots and alpine boots will work ...


5

If you have the equipment already, I would go back to the book and practice using the equipment. In the US the standard text is Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills; there may be equivalents in other countries. Basic techniques such as knots can be practiced in your home, and a bit of regular practice each day should soon make them second nature. With a ...


5

This is an excellent article comparing the two. Use the ski when you need the grip but still want the flotation of the ski. You are limited to how steep you can go with a ski. This is a picture of people using the ski crampon. proskiservice The boot is better when it is too steep for ski, or the snow is so hard you need more bite. You need to make ...


5

First of all I have to admit that the following is mostly not based on knowledge but more or less on educated guessing, so take it with a grain of salt. Alpine tours Let's first consider hiring a guide in the Alps (maximum height below 5000m). Here the answer, if you will be asked for a tour book should be in nearly all cases "No". Here we can just divide ...


5

You can, but how well you glide will vary depending on your skins. Some styles glide better than others, and you will glide more with a shorter skin opposed to a full length skin. There's a 2km approach to where I go backcountry skiing most of the time. Most people skin in the whole 2km on the flat, but I've been skiing the approach in the past couple of ...


5

I haven't tried it myself, but I know of someone who sometimes waxes the entire base of his AT skis with grip wax instead of putting his skins on. It works perfectly fine for exactly the same conditions that would work with cross-country skis, so a gentle uphill will work. His first descent might be a bit slower, but the wax often disappears by the end of ...


5

Beacons are tough. Tougher than you if you get thrown against a rock or a tree or buried under the snow. With that in mind, if things were so bad that there was any concern about my beacon being damaged in an avalanche I would certainly be more worried about whether I could survive the impact. Clothing is not going to provide much shielding against the sort ...


4

No one uses them as absolute evidence, as you could always fake them, but they can really help a tour guide get a feel for your level of experience and to understand which situations you felt comfortable with and which caused you problems. They also help you remember how a particular tour went, as afterwards you may not remember in detail.


4

From looking at the pictures I would say that for the "default" conditions at summer glacier/alpine tours they should be perfectly fine. In dry but slightly coldish conditions they will give you good grip and rope handling, as long as you don't have to dig through snow with them. The reason why you have got cold fingers while cycling might be on the one ...


4

There are many factors to consider when purchasing skis, but for the most part, unless you're an avid skier and recognize the advantages of having one pair of skis over another then it's probably not going to make much of a difference for your first pair. For example, I'm currently riding a pair of light camber 190's 130,95,110mm in the back country. They ...


4

For AT/Randonee on mountains, you'll need to go up steep (~30°) slopes on skins. You'll need a skin will cover nearly the whole ski base, and that won't slide easily at all (I think my skins require more than 10° of slope to go downhill). Because of that friction, you will not experience much that resembles cross country skiing, except for maybe some ...


4

I don't think you can find them anymore, but ~10 years ago Scarpa was selling a light and pretty soft plastic AT boot with toe bellows (like modern telemark boots). They were great for my Dad to transition to AT gear from 3-pin telemarking on leather boots. On wildsnow.com they have a pretty good write up about them. The heavier version (F3) might be easier ...


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