14

Given that your avalanche beacon has the potential to be your partner's lifeline (or your own), it makes sense to protect it. Rocks, branches, skis, poles, ice tools, there's a lot that could potentially damage this important piece of equipment before you even enter avalanche terrain. In the event of an avalanche, it's not just the pressure of snow on ...


5

Beacons are tough. Tougher than you if you get thrown against a rock or a tree or buried under the snow. With that in mind, if things were so bad that there was any concern about my beacon being damaged in an avalanche I would certainly be more worried about whether I could survive the impact. Clothing is not going to provide much shielding against the sort ...


2

The biggest reason I've always believed that you wear your beacon next to your base layer is battery life. Cold is well known to reduce battery life. By keeping the beacon close to your body you r beacon will function longer and may even have a stronger signal because the batteries aren't fighting the cold. I don't know how much of a difference this makes ...


1

the adapter is heavy as is the entire setup (downhilll skis+bindings+adapter+boots), if you want to take your kids out to backcountry for more than 30-60 minutes, this will be very heavy for them... Instead, take an old pair of downhill skis, rivet the climbing skins to them... attach cross-country binding and put them in cross-country ski boots. Put the ...


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