Hot answers tagged

40

Yes, you absolutely should rescue the climber when the situation allows. The reason that matters most is suspension trauma: Prolonged motionless hanging in a harness can lead to loss of consciousness and eventually even death. Of course you say the victim is conscious, so he might be able to move or even install a foot-loop to transition weight to his legs. ...


27

I do not have much alpine experience Climbing the Breithorn in the winter is a much different matter than in the spring or summer. Any 4,000 meter peak in the alps is subject to arctic weather conditions with high winds and temperatures far below freezing. There is also going to be very deep snow, so unless you know how to ski or snowshoe, you are going to ...


21

Additionally to @imsodins brilliant answer, I'd say the same applies to almost any mountain rescue situation: if you are able to contribute to the situation while maintaining your own safety, do it (and if you're not able, stay out of the way of the rescue team) securing your position takes precedence over the next steps (you don't want to be the next task ...


20

TLDR: Because its much harder that way and the extra altitude of the Himalayas makes it that much more difficult. Alpine style refers to mountaineering in a self-sufficient manner, thereby carrying all of one's food, shelter, equipment, etc. as one climbs, as opposed to expedition style (or siege style) mountaineering which involves setting up a fixed ...


14

Short roping is dangerous, but it is also a critical part of guiding. This presentation touches on a lot of the reasons for short roping and risks associated with it. Short roping is claimed to provide three advantages. The first is that the short rope increases the confidence of the weaker climber and there by decreases the likelihood of a fall. The second ...


14

As a general rule, I think it unwise to attempt, solo, for the first time, the sort of climb that one has no experience with, especially if it carries the potential for a serious accident. You have winter against you, ice against you, inexperience against you, and possibly an unknown reaction to 4,164 meters against you. Solo? No, not unless your meaning ...


11

alpine style remains relatively rare in the Himalayas Actually, as far as I can tell from the current climbing literature, alpine style climbs in the Himalaya are relatively common these days. Expedition style climbs (at least the only ones that attract any attention) are now mostly for paying customers with guides. I suspect there are also still private ...


10

For winter walking a traditional straight-shafted mountaineering axe seems most appropriate. This would include products like the very common BD Raven or Raven Pro, and also those with a slight bend such as the Petzl Summit, Grivel Air Tech Evo, and BD Venom. As there are existing questions regarding length (How do I know what size ice axe I should get?), ...


9

The most important point in any emergency is to avoid making the situation worse. The situation you describe is dynamic and may have several outcomes. Its not really possible to make a decision without seeing the details of the situation. If you attempt to help and mess up there may be more casualties to rescue and the injuries may be worse. Alternatively ...


8

Firstly, the technique you describe is actually called "Moving together" at least by British climbers. The technique is used to move rapidly on relatively easy ground while also providing a degree of protection from falls. It is also used to rope up while crossing glaciers. This website has a good set of photos showing how to attach the rope to your harness ...


7

In the UK and at least some other European countries, it is very common to dig in caves to get through blocked passages. Normally this is done through either sections of cave blocked by boulders from ancient roof collapses or through sediments left from post-Ice Age flooding. For example, this photo looking upwards to the caver at the top of a dig currently ...


7

Short roping is an advanced technique, but it is a necessary one to progress quickly and safely in the mountains. As with most techniques, knowing when to apply it just as important (or more) as the technique itself. The safety in short-roping comes from three main ingredients: Coaching the climber through easy moves. Preventing a slip from turning into a ...


6

Look in the women's section of your favorite clothing supplier. The average woman is shorter than the average man, which means there are often smaller sizes in these selections. They also have some options that are not available in mens clothes. Unfortunately Women's clothes often have small pockets, so when shopping the women's section, besure to test ...


6

Searching an ice axe for what I would call classical alpine terrain isn't that tough in my opinion. There might be fancy new features and very durable items (T-classification) but those might not be necessary for an ice axe typically used as a walking support. Most important for me is the correct length of the shaft so that you can actually reach the ground ...


6

I am pretty certain that I have already answered why this is dangerous here. As for when it would be a valid technique, If the terrain is such that there is a slight risk of falling, but not enough to justify putting in intermediate placements. When balancing the need for speed with the risk of falling such as trying to get down before a storm. This is ...


6

The answer to this question at its most basic level is generally use your ski crampons until you would feel more safe using boot crampons. I suspect since you asked this question you aren't very experienced with ski crampons and/or boot crampons so I'm going to talk a little bit about their use cases. Ski crampons are only used when ascending, and used in ...


5

This is an excellent article comparing the two. Use the ski when you need the grip but still want the flotation of the ski. You are limited to how steep you can go with a ski. This is a picture of people using the ski crampon. proskiservice The boot is better when it is too steep for ski, or the snow is so hard you need more bite. You need to make ...


5

There are some things that will help in getting up early without an alarm. Drink more water than normal before bed , this ensures that you won't sleep all of the way through the night. Try to sleep so that the rising moon/early twilight will shine on you earlier (don't sleep on the west side of a big rock) Once, up don't go back to sleep even if that means ...


5

When I was in central Alaska, courtesy of Uncle Sam, we wore vapor barrier boots. They are great for extremely low temperatures, but of you are heavily exerting in milder weather* (down to -23C/-10F range), your socks would get downright soggy. Some soldiers did put anti-perspirant on their feet to help with cold and trench foot symptoms. If plastic ...


4

Looks like you have a very limited range of brands over on your island * Beside the brands you already mentioned here are some others that spring to mind: Hanwag Lowa Mammut Salewa Dachstein I know, you're the continent, we're the island ;-) !


4

How about Via Dinarica, virtually no information and similar experience in another neck of the Balkans. Three trails, each about 650 km - still more of an idea than established project. Part of it overlaps with the Peaks of the Balkans route.


3

I never understood the reason for this technique, but let me guess. When one of the people is much more experienced than the other, he can judge where there is no risk (99% of the time), and when there is slight risk (let's say 1%). In the risky situations, short rope allows for quick and efficient belay, or even physical "help". What you usually see is ...


2

I'd like to add one point to the other good answers: You call mountain rescue and they say they will be there in 30 mins. As you are in communication with rescue, once you have answered all their questions, ask them how to proceed meanwhile (tell what knowledge and equipment you have). Side note: plausibility check for the scenario: You meant to say ...


2

Many areas in Scotland can be quite quiet, especially outside the peak season. There are also many long distance walks ranging from the well known to the less so. I've heard the Rob Roy way and the Cape Wrath trail are quiet good although I've actually done neither. There is no system of manned mountain huts like in many places but many unmanned bothies ...


2

I have used the Mammut Smart Alpine with many biners, including the GridLock. My impression is that, while the Smart does have the tendency to get caught and stuck when the rope runs over the lock when using a common biner, it still gets caught with a cross-load protecting one (although it is less common). In my experience, what really helps avoiding the ...


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