Hot answers tagged

27

I do not have much alpine experience Climbing the Breithorn in the winter is a much different matter than in the spring or summer. Any 4,000 meter peak in the alps is subject to arctic weather conditions with high winds and temperatures far below freezing. There is also going to be very deep snow, so unless you know how to ski or snowshoe, you are going to ...


16

That depends entirely on weather conditions and the paths you plan to take. If you stay on cleared roads, your Icetrekkers should be sufficient (and may not even be necessary). The main problem will be snow, not ice. Hiking paths will generally not be cleared of snow, so you'd need snowshoes or touring skis. Additionally, if there is (or has been) heavy ...


14

As a general rule, I think it unwise to attempt, solo, for the first time, the sort of climb that one has no experience with, especially if it carries the potential for a serious accident. You have winter against you, ice against you, inexperience against you, and possibly an unknown reaction to 4,164 meters against you. Solo? No, not unless your meaning ...


13

tl;dr What you describe is absolutely allowed (using a bivouac to spend one night). If you set up a small camp (described as a "planned bivouac" further in this text), you shouldn't be in a protected area. Bivouac Wikipedia Sleeping one night without a tent or a small igloo. An emergency bivouac is basically allowed everywhere. A planned bivouac is ...


10

The solvay biwak is solely an emergency shelter. There is an emergency radio available. So if you sleep there without declaring an emergency (even if just to inform the authorities) you have to expect to be fined (the locals are very strict and fines not negligible). In August you cannot expect snow around the hut (though you might get lucky and it can snow ...


10

There are several things that can be more dangerous in the mountains when the snow is melting, There can be an increased risk of avalanche danger. Snowbridges over crevasses can be melting out. Bergschrunds widen up and pull away from the rock. In bolder fields the rocks trap the heat and then melt out around them, and this can leave airpockets you can fall ...


9

Charlie Brumbaugh's answer is fairly comprehensive about the dangers. I will address some ideas on how to deal with this sort of trip. Avalanche Hazard. A: Take an avalanche safety course. It will teach you something about how to recognize possible danger zones. B: Take a set of avalanche beacons, probes, and shovels. C: When in a high hazard area ...


7

Having just returned from our trip, I will try to provide a description of how we planned it and how things worked out. When we arrived in Vienna we purchased a topographic map of the Gesause region at a book store. With this in hand, we decided to take a train from Vienna to Gaishorn am See, to the south of the park. The train takes three hours and isn't ...


7

This might depend on the area. At least in Switzerland the answer is simple: You can use them for planned overnight stays. They are usually just a small part of the entire hut with none to rudimentary to quite luxury cooking/heating facilities. Their size and equipment present varies greatly between different huts. Most SAC huts have one though. You should ...


7

It is allowed if there's no sign declaring it as Naturschutzgebiet/Naturschutzzone this is german for natural reserve if there's no such sign or you know for sure your not in such a reserve, it's safe to swim legally. However, best practice is to ask at the local tourist information center.


6

I walked through this area on the Grande Traversata delle Alpi a couple of years back and in some valleys the trees were just beginning to turn by the start of October. I would imagine that this would vary a lot by altitude, by the orientation of the valley, and from year to year. Note that if you're going into the higher areas in October you should be ...


5

In the Alps there is a dense network of huts mostly maintained by the local alpine clubs. There are also some private huts mostly owned by mountain guide associations. Most of the huts are closing down towards the end of September but many have winter rooms or small bivy huts that are accessible for the whole year. Especially Italy has a lot of bivy huts ...


5

The linked topic of @Eyal is a good starting point to get an idea what to expect on those kind of hut treks. I would recommend to get information from online trip reports like on the site you linked to. They already marked the different sections of the Via Alpina where you could pick out 5 sections/days. First of all you should get something to work with ...


5

I can recommend the Verwall-Trek. It is a trek from St. Christoph (Arlberg, near St. Anton) via the Kaltenberghütte, Konstanzer Hütte, Neue Heilbronner Hütte, Friedrichshafener Hütte, Darmstädter Hütte, Niederelbehütte und Edmund-Graf-Hütte to Pettneu. Of course you can adjust the route as you wish. I recommend to fly to Friedrichshafen or Innsbruck and then ...


4

I'm Swiss and I've been drinking water from mountain streams all my life, without any altitude restriction, while observing three basic rules. You can drink the water if: the river is small enough to jump across it there is no cattle (alpage) above, where cows, goats and sheep may poo into the water there is no human settlement above Drinking this water is ...


4

I suppose you mean outside of village, so you are talking about streams and sources. In any alpine areas (France, Italy, Switzerland, Austria) I drink water unfiltered when I assume that there are no alps (place with cattle during summer) upstream, which worked for me. Of course you usually cannot be 100% sure about it, but almost so. If there is cattle ...


4

Well, having done both I can safely say that the haute route was harder for me. I've finished the Annapurna in a relatively good condition last year, and finished the haute route with 2 kneepads, a sore ankle and had to buy better trekking poles thru-out the trek (haven't used a trekking pole at all last year). However, my friend Ophir who has done both ...


4

Why not try the Wilder Kaiser, it's not in Innsbruck, only some 55mins drive, but it's pretty dame awesome and very kid friendly! More than 400km of walking paths make the Wilder Kaiser mountains an absolute gem for hiking holidays. Trails include accurate directions and approximate walk times. Hiking from hut to hut There is a remarkably diverse paradise ...


4

I found a site that has a number of old climbing photographs from around that time and I think is your best option (that I could find). Historical Rock Climbing Images 1890s - 1930s There is also the Yorkshire Ramblers Journal which goes back all the way to 1899 and some of the articles have pictures. From that one call pull the names of the photographers ...


3

Warnings and Caveats Everyone sleeps different. Some people sleep much warmer than others while others sleep incredibly cold. You can try and determine this in your house or better your backyard, but you really won't know until you are sleeping while hungry, exhausted and in the actual weather you are dealing with. Humidity effects people differently and so ...


3

1) You can expect the lowest Jun-Sep temperatures will be above 0 °C most of the time. Coldest temperatures on Kredarica (2515 m, in Slovenian Alps) in 2016: Jun: -1 °C July: -2.1 °C August: -3 °C September: -2.9 °C 10-day forecast for Kredarica: The lowest morning temperatures between 21st and 29th June will be from -3 to +8 °C and this is colder than ...


3

With the information on the website and g00gle maps, I think the whole parcour should be between 1500m and max. 1600m.


2

I was there a few days ago. The highest point of the 3D course was 1800 m and starts at 1600 m. Most of the hiking trails however go up to nearly 1900 m and one is even close to 2100 m.


2

All in Charlie Brumbaugh's answer is true. However, SLOW melting over a long time is often some of the safest conditions you can travel in. It can smooth out weak layers in the snow, that would have been avalanche prone. Those layers can stay there as triggers for avalanches for many weeks -- rather some months. In Norway we often have problems with these ...


2

Can I safelly assume, that it will not get much below 0°C in summer in the Alps at around 2000 meters altitude? I would say that very broadly this assumption will hold, but the question is what you will be betting on it. There can certainly be situations where it gets colder, although this is probably quite unlikely. If it getting colder means that you ...


2

Your trail appears to follow a ski slope all the way, so you can pretty much rule out ferratas or technical climbing. Still, the snow may cover some rougher terrain in the winter (like streams that can be difficult to cross), so I'd not rely on this alone. It may not be the nicest kind of terrain to hike on, or their might be fenced-off pastures in the ...


1

According to the Italian language Grande Traversate delle Alpi, Vol. 2, the GTA continues to the Lago Maggiore, which (unlike any other description I've seen) would be consistent with the photo I took above the Val Agrasino. According to a review of this book, the northern/eastern end would be Cannobio at the Lago Maggiore.


1

Don't try it. The (walking) mountaineering season is over, there is now too much snow in the high mountains and it definitely will not get easier till January. You have to wait until the Summer when the snow starts to get more compact. An early date for a 4000s ascent is June. For mountaineering now you either need skis that carry you over soft powder or a ...


1

I forgot to post what we ended up doing here, so I'll do that now (better late than never) Basically, we slept two nights in Hottinger Alm, which is really close to Innsbruck. We took the "Nordkette” to Hungersberg, and from there we walked to Umbruggler Alm, had lunch, and continued on to Hottinger Alm. It's uphill, but the stop along the way made it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible