33

No, there's no chance to distinguish the print of a large dog from one of a wolf. However, you can still differentiate between them, if you have a whole track. Dogs walk remarkable different than their ancestors. Compared to a wolf, a dog draws a sinuous line like it was drunk. The best way to determine if wolves are present is to find their tracks. ...


22

The pool of water they are in is called a vernal pool. Amphibians and other woodland creatures take advantage of these temporary pools while they last. Not having anything for scale in the picture, they appear to be salamander eggs similar to those shown on this site:


15

They are Sea Urchins and they taste like mussels. People mostly eat them raw. They're actually pretty tasty. Oh yeah, you'll peel off the shell and go for the slimy flesh, a delicacy with fresh lemonjuice and a pinch of salt. I used to pick them open with my pocketknife and slurp them up with some saltwater (depending on the sea it's probably not the most ...


14

Looks like a female capercaillie to me. What killed it could be anything. Because the feathers seem pretty much intact I'd suspect a bird of prey like a goshawk. Here is a picture of a female capercaillie, the tail feathers match up. See Western capercaillie. the bird is found across Eurasia, and definitely in Sweden.


14

That's not a lizard that's a smooth newt. Source None of the lizards in the UK look anything like that, and the tail and lines are what I am basing my identification off of. Also see Attracting British Amphibians to your Water Garden and Getting to know your newts.


13

That was definitely a beaver. Nothing else has quite the chewing power of a beaver, for example accoring to Wikipedia, these trees were cut by beavers in a single night. Based on the color of those chips, I would say that you were there less than a week if not sooner from when the beaver was chewing the tree down. The reason that I don't think its a ...


12

I originally thought a porcupine did this (see my other answer), but after seeing your new photos and a closer look at the original ones I now have a different theory. Your tree was first infested by some kind of beetle. These beetles burrowed in the cambium layer, making the channels. After the tree was full of lots of yummy fat beetles, a bear came ...


12

Based on this list of turtles in Massachusetts, and this one as well as the pointed nose and the jagged back shell, I am going to say that this is a common snapping turtle. For more information I would suggest Wikipedia. It a good thing that you husband didn't touch it, because they are capable of biting (link has gross picture).


12

That looks like the spine and pelvis of a raccoon: . Although the raccoon is not native to Germany, they were introduced there in the 1930s and can be found in the wild. The map below shows raccoons killed or found dead 2001-2003. So while it's highly unlikely that you stumbled across the remains of a raccoon, it is possible. See wikipedia for more ...


11

I absolutely love bats and always have. In the UK we have eighteen species of bat. The Bat Conservation have a nice list for all the common UK species, including those which breed in the UK (which is 17 out of the 18 species, so we're doing quite well!). The above link also has a recording of the noise each bat makes, which should help you work out the ...


11

That snow clearly isn't fresh and has been slowly melting and refreezing for a few days. The thing is, prints get larger as the snow melts. I own retrievers that weight about 34 kg (75 lb) and I've seen their prints appear that large after a few days of mild temps even though they're significantly smaller than the average North American wolf. So whatever ...


10

Almost certainly, this is the work of a woodpecker foraging for grubs in a dead and rotting tree: they tend to move methodically up the trunk excavating at intervals, producing the Swiss cheese effect visible in your photo. This being Finland, your culprit is probably the black woodpecker Dryocopus martius. For comparison, here's a stock photo entitled "...


10

The answer is yes, but it may require equipment, which is not just the human ear. The publication quoted below is from Montana State University Disentangling canid howls across multiple species and subspecies: Structure in a complex communication channel. (It is not clear whether this work is part of the Canid Howl Project which welcomes contributions of ...


10

The domestic cat and the bobcat look completely different, so it would be fairly easy to distinguish them. The bobbed tail cannot be relied on by itself, as there is a domestic breed of cat called the Manx that has a naturally bobbed tail, as well. However, this breed is a bit rare compared to all of the other breeds of domestic cat, which have a naturally ...


10

That's a mottled sea hare. Image source Aplysia fasciata, common name the "mottled sea hare", or the "sooty sea hare", is an Atlantic species of sea hare or sea slug, a marine opisthobranch gastropod mollusk in the family Aplysiidae. ... Aplysia fasciata can grow to sizes up to 40 cm long. Coloring is often black or a very dark brown, sometimes ...


9

This is a common snapping turtle. It's not a tortoise. The biggest difference is that turtles are aquatic, spending most of their time in the water, while tortoises live on land. As for your other questions: Age: It's not easy to tell the age of the snapper. They reach full size between 8 and 10 years old. Adults measure from 9.5 to 14.5 inches (24 to 36 ...


9

According to an article on caribou sex identification by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game Only the white rump without a [black] vulva patch or the presence of a penis sheath should be used for positive identification [of a male caribou]. The article says that both sexes have antlers, and there is significant overlap between young bulls and mature ...


8

The best way to identify bats in flight is to use a bat detector. This is a device with a microphone that listens to the bats high frequency calls, and plays them back at a lower frequency. Bats use echolocation calls to find out what is around them. For most UK bats, these are typically between 30KHz and 80KHz. So they are not audible to humans. Different ...


8

It's possible that what you saw was normal for a jaguar. The Panthera species (leopards [Panthera pardus] in Asia and Africa, and jaguars [Panthera onca] in the Americas) can have melanistic colours like many species. They're commonly known as Black Panthers. Sometimes you can still see a leopard / jaguars spots through the black fur, but it's still ...


8

In most ways, it looks like porcupine to me. The scratch marks going perpendicular to the tree trunk make it less likely to be bear, deer, or elk. Bear will strip a tree like this if it is rotten and there are lots of bugs underneath the bark, but generally you see this in the fall, not this far into winter, and it is more often stumps and rotten trees. ...


7

I am almost certain this is caused by Sciuris niger or the Fox squirrel. In south Georgia they are mostly light gray with black and white, however where I am at slightly above the fall line in Georgia they have more red and orange tones mixed in their gray. They are much larger than the common Eastern gray squirrel. I have many acres of old growth ...


7

Looks kind of like a walleye to me. I didn't think there was anything else worth catching in Ontario, in NW Ontario at least this is what everyone goes fishing for, they're one of the tastier fishes. They're fighters too, you always expect them to big bigger than they are when you reel them in.


7

Note: This answer has been revised based on a higher quality photo I am not a toad expert, but I think it is likely a Woodhouse's Toad based on this handy guide. One of the key features is the pale stripe down the back and the cranial crests; the absence of which would make it a Boreal Toad or the large symmetrical dark splotches that would make it a Great ...


6

This does look like some sort of turtle. Snapping turtles can easily get to the size you mention, and are fairly common. The picture doesn't give the impression the tracks are really 10 inches apart. They seem narrower than that, which would open the possibility for a number of other turtles. Box turtles get to a reasonable size, and then there are a ...


6

Pine Martens aren't native to the Lake District as yet - you need to go further north to find them (and then in small numbers). This will most likely be one the more common mustelids - Stoats will happily (and greedily) take rabbits, which I believe are your bones. Without a photo/dimensions of the scat, I have to offer the most likely answer here. And ...


5

This is my answer to your question, I am new here but I really enjoy this type of thing. In 2011, we had a very bad tornado come through our property. After that I have heard 4-5 new bird calls, which I have never before around here (Tennessee), and 2 at night. If you think back to when you first heard this bird, had there been any bad storms where you live? ...


5

Possible culprits: Opossums: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6D-iFOsRhJ4 Raccoons: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAG0V1AauJs Badgers: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwrG_HdH2oY Foxes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPLJ0Gbu5D8 Porcupines: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_yoCesDLhg Skunks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfrXnBMnNvg There ...


5

First: it is very difficult to exactly determine the species of a skeleton, much more so a partial one (at least if you can not do DNA analysis). I have worked on archaeological digs where we consulted experts for this, and even they were clueless in many cases when it came down to identifying the origin of small sets of bones. An educated guess: From the ...


5

Bobcats have short stubby tails. The typical house cat has a tail almost the length of its body. Bobcats have a specific color pattern. House cats have all kinds of colors and patterns due to the human selection and lack of natural selection.


5

I looked at Wikipedia, List of snakes of connecticut and the WhatSnakeIsThat listing. It seems it most likely is one of these 3 based on the back color: Black Racer (Coluber constrictor) - 20 to 60 inches, white, light tan or yellow belly. Eastern Ratsnake (Pantherophis alleghaniensis) - 36-72 inches with a black and white checkerboard belly, doesn't sound ...


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