Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
25

It depends on what the game does and starts when you take your shot. If the game drops: Do NOT move. Sit and watch it. Wait at least 15 minutes. Often game will drop and freeze, even when injured, then stand up minutes later and stroll off. If it stands, shoot it. If you miss again, follow steps in the next part. If the game runs: Mark where the game ...


11

That snow clearly isn't fresh and has been slowly melting and refreezing for a few days. The thing is, prints get larger as the snow melts. I own retrievers that weight about 34 kg (75 lb) and I've seen their prints appear that large after a few days of mild temps even though they're significantly smaller than the average North American wolf. So whatever ...


6

This does look like some sort of turtle. Snapping turtles can easily get to the size you mention, and are fairly common. The picture doesn't give the impression the tracks are really 10 inches apart. They seem narrower than that, which would open the possibility for a number of other turtles. Box turtles get to a reasonable size, and then there are a ...


6

Are there resources for identifying dinosaur tracks? No; Dinosaur tracks are called trace fossils Trace fossils are classified in various ways for different purposes. Traces can be classified taxonomically (by morphology), ethologically (by behavior), and toponomically, that is, according to their relationship to the surrounding sedimentary layers. ...


5

The shape of that track reminds me of an ornithopod. There can be some confusion as to how to identify specifically which ornithopod might have made that track (Manus track preservation bias as a key factor for assessing trackmaker identity and quadrupedalism in basal ornithopods, Castanera D, Vila B, Razzolini NL, Falkingham PL, Canudo JI, Manning PL, ...


5

For assistance in identifying them, I've added some photos that I took. Here is a picture I took recently of a mountain lion track on a log that crossed a stream. The knife is 4.2" long, so the paws are about 4.2" wide, which is typical of an adult cougar. The larger paw was planted first followed by the smaller paw imprinted over it. Notice no claw ...


4

Those look like fox tracks. We do have foxes in the Southeastern US. They are characterized by having the two middle toes noticeably (almost a full toe) forward of the outer two toes. I've ruled out squirrel, opossum, rabbit, mouse, rat, raccoon, cat, and weasel in the process of my research. For an example, look near the bottom of this page: http://www....


3

The easy way to think of this is that tracks left in concrete sidewalks are true tracks while pouring plaster of paris into animals tracks left in mud would results in a cast. Sometimes the dinosaur tracks were made in materials that turned to stone and were then preserved as true tracks, and sometimes the tracks were made in soft materials and then filled ...


3

The easiest time to find them is just after a fresh snowfall. Optimum conditions are enough snow for the tracks to be clearly visible without preventing one from driving back roads. The way people and especially hunters will find tracks is to drive the back roads in the morning just after a fresh snow looking for tracks crossing the road where they are most ...


2

This Cabo da Roca guide offers three options: a badger, an Egyptian mongoose, or a weasel. Badger is quite big and, according to East Surrey Badger Protection Society, "The front paws of an adult badger range from about 4.5 cm to 6.5 cm across for a large boar". The print is also different - see, for example, here. As for mongoose - I couldn't find any ...


2

There are two things that can help one estimate the size, Size of the individual tracks themselves. The stride length (distance between tracks on the same size) The size of the tracks will stay the same no matter how an animal is moving, however, when an animal runs, the stride length will increase so it's not as good an indicator. As far as determining ...


2

First off, the tyrannosaurus dinosaurs are in the suborder Theropoda, and were bipedal, which is a fancy way of saying that they walked on two feet. They had three toes and one dewclaw. The ones found in British Columbia were over 2 feet long and over 5 feet between tracks. Finally, these tracks are incredibly rare with discoveries in, 1 track 1983 in ...


1

The answer is members of the dog family of animals as they are the other type of animals with paws that a similar in size wolves coyotes (have to be a really big coyote or very small mountain lion) domestic dogs (the bigger varieties i.e not Chihuahuas) A full grown mountain lion will leave bigger tracks than those of any of the animals listed above but ...


1

There are resources, but be aware that it is rather difficult to get a definitive answer. Here is a digital book published by the Earth Sciences department of the University of Bristol with a section on identifying track makers: http://palaeo.gly.bris.ac.uk/Palaeofiles/Tracks/default.html Here's a page at the UC Berkeley Museum of Paleontology, and notice ...


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