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14

According to this guide, it is recommended when testing to first shoot with fletched arrows before shooting with the unfletched ones, always aiming at the same point. It gives you a control group to compare with the bare ones. Defects in the spine or nocking point position should affect the flight significantly enough to be able to distinguish it from bad ...


13

A kisser button, perhaps? They are a button on your string designed specifically to help orient your head.


13

A paper bin is going to make a fairly small stopping area. Hopefully there is something more substantial (like a wall) behind the target that will stop the arrow if you happen to miss the target entirely. A couple of bales of hay make a larger area, small bales are relatively inexpensive and reliably stop arrows without damaging them. The best quality, ...


11

On a longbow you rest the arrow on your hand. If you do it for many hours it can cause irritation so some wear a glove to avoid this. As for the hand pulling the string it is another form of a finger tab. I have a three fingered glove. It's a matter of preference for this. I found a glove more comfortable than a finger tab.


11

The simple answer is yes, you can definitely use waste paper or cardboard to stop an arrow. Various folks have used cardboard boxes, flattened, and piled up to anywhere between 6 and 12 inches thick, held together with straps or duct tape. You'd need to use trial and error to find out what thickness works for you - if you compress the cardboard tighter you ...


10

In simple terms. Yes. But it is easily avoided. When not in use dry off the bow and keep it in a waterproof case. Like anything, prolonged moisture is damaging. Using it in the rain is no problem, I'm talking about days or weeks without being dryed. Same goes with the string. They are usually coated in beeswax but moisture will eventually take effect. It'...


10

I would lash it to the side of the pack, vertically, with nylon straps that you can purchase at any outdoor sporting store. You may have a little bit of trouble walking beneath branches or fallen trees if it extends too high above you. You should also remember that a bow is considered hunting equipment and, depending on the state you are in, you can be in ...


10

I know that bow length needs to match the draw length mostly because you lose precision if overdrawing it as soon as the string stop touching the limbs and just hold on the tips, string can swing sideways and affect arrow travel. Holy... - no! Just no! No, no, no, no, no :) There are even 44" (38" string) which are able to shoot accurate 'till 32" ...


10

They are usually used for making your arrows easier to find in low light / cloudy conditions. Also they give a certain flair if you happen to be filming your shot. Imagine hunting in a forest, light isn't that great and it's hard to use a metal detector, and you miss. The idea is so long as you know the general area where it might have landed you will have ...


9

You can string a recurve by bracing it on your foot. For casual shooting it is okay but I would advise against it. While it can twist the limbs, the actual issue is the uneven stress on the screws / bolts that hold the limbs in place. Believe me, you don't want one of them slipping mid draw. I would suggest getting a stringer. They save a lot of time and ...


9

Artificial vanes are heaps more durable than feathers and being artificial, they are weather resistant. One of the things I most see in the field on a wet day is long bowers covering arrows with a plastic bag because they won't fly well if feathers get wet.


9

If you're simply looking for a bag to transport your bow in, then go shopping for a compound bow bag. There is a large selection of bags available. If you're specifically looking to invest in a backpack that you can strap your bow too, then you can look for a compatible bow cover to conceal your bow. If you just want to get to the range without getting ...


8

Short answer The draw weight of a bow is the pull weight which applies to your fingers on the string while the bow is fully stretched. This weight changes with the length you stretch the bow. So, to compare different bows, the bowyers often refer to 28 inches. This indication often looks like this 50#@28". This basically means that you have to hold 55 ...


8

Hunting with bow is not allowed in Sweden, but a bow does not require a license, and the Swedish law for the nature ("allemandsretten") is very liberal, so I guess it is ok shoot at targets, when not near any people. The Swedish weapons guide (in Swedish, sorry) https://polisen.se/Global/www%20och%20Intrapolis/FAP/FAP551_3_RPSFS2009_13.pdf Bows A ...


8

As far as I know, the only time you need to unstring your compound bow is when you're replacing the string, or doing some other repair. If you have an older compound bow that's made from laminated wood, then you'll want to back off the tension on your string when you store it, but modern compound bows have limbs that are rated up to 200,000psi, and can be ...


8

Basically I agree with ShemSeger's answer: Yes! But don't take my word for it, see for yourself: Stan Lee's Superhumans: Deadly Shot This guy is a real-life Hawkeye, he very matter-of-factly states that if he can see it, he can hit it with his bow and an arrow. And if you watch the video, you'll see that it's true, he hits everything, ...


8

Yes! But don't take my word for it, see for yourself: Stan Lee's Superhumans: Deadly Shot This guy is a real-life Hawkeye, he very matter-of-factly states that if he can see it, he can hit it with his bow and an arrow. And if you watch the video, you'll see that it's true, he hits everything, including a tiny pill flicked up into the air. Then there's ...


8

The problem with the longbow discussion is that it changes from country to country. For example in the UK the longbow and american flatbow are two separate categories. In the UK a longbow is described as such: The bow shall be the traditional longbow made from wood, either "self", "backed", or "laminated" with cambered (stacked) belly and horn nocks. It ...


8

I'm not an archer, however, I would be surprised if you would not notice any difference with your backpack as compared to no backpack – at least in the beginning. Basically with every skill that requires precise and coordinated movement of your body the precision is more or less strongly susceptible to changes of the situation in which it is performed. This ...


8

Yes. There are two common approaches to this: Press moistened paper into the target container, which can be a box of any sort. The paper should be wet enough and pressed hard enough that at least a little bit of water is squeezed out upon pressing. You don't have to wait for it to dry to shoot it. The advantage of pressing wet paper hard is that you can ...


8

Stopping power The target should be strong enough to stop arrows reliably. It's better to work with a good margin here, especially if the target is used with different arrows (carbon tend to have a lot more piercing power) or stronger bows. Arrows should always be stopped well before the fletching reaches the target, otherwise you'll run into the danger of ...


7

I assume by "damaging it" you refer to the insert. To remove it you have to heat the glue to a temperature where it melts. If a part of the insert is visible, fixate it in a bar clamp. If not, put something in it like an old metal tip or anything metal that fits into the insert and fixate this in the bar clamp. Then you use what you have at your disposal to ...


7

While there are a variety of different arrows, there are some common signs you can look out for. First of all are the fletchings. If they are supposed to be straight, check if they still are. Others have a bend or curve in them, if this is the case check if the curve is still correct. Also check to make sure they are fully attached to the arrow. Second ...


7

That would, quite simply, be a pocket quiver.


7

A tricky one this. Some people swear they do, others swear they don't. Personally I have never used them as I always feared they might throw off my shot. There is no definitive evidence that they will have an impact however. I can tell you that, even with a tracer, it's damned hard to find an arrow in grass. We used to use a metal detector to find them. ...


7

I'll focus on the directly archery related things. I think it's quite obvious that the horse is heavily moving and thus you've to learn to absorb this movement in your hips. The main difference is, that you need to be fast. You don't have time to sit in your anchor and focus. You've to look, draw, anchor, release in just a second. Horsebows are also ...


7

Heating can help, but you have to be careful, infact an "insert removal tool" is basically a brass bolt as tip of a soldering iron. However if you have a soldering iron with bent needle tip for electronics you will be able to work it only where you need running into the threads, you will clean it but its slow. Dental picks (metal ones) work too if you have ...


7

Its something that happens in every sport. Generally target shooting the mantra is: bad day, drop everything for awhile, go get a beer, chitchat, help others in the club or simply call it the day. The worst thing one can do is fussing on a bad shot, and after that it becomes fussing about fussing on the bad shot and it never ends. You can train yourself in ...


7

FOC is "front of center", which is a term for how far the center of mass is relatively from the midpoint of the arrow. There doesn't seem to be a consensus on what an "ideal" FOC is, but I hear anything in the 7-15% range will provide a good balance of distance versus stability (source). It can still be used as a way to measure the weighting/balancing/feel ...


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