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15

In North America they're called cattle guards, or Texas gates, and they are everywhere (where I'm from at least). They're intended to replace a conventional gate by discouraging livestock from crossing, while also accommodating vehicles by not making them stop to open and close a gate door. They are treacherous for cattle, who have to learn not to attempt ...


13

There are different kind of obstacles so that farm animals like cows on alpine pastures stay in the related territory. If you hike, you often pass little doors or Z-shaped wooden obstacles or have to lift gates. For dirt roads this is similar, the cattle needs to be restricted so e.g. with a "Weiderost". In comparison to a gate you can always overcome the ...


13

tl;dr What you describe is absolutely allowed (using a bivouac to spend one night). If you set up a small camp (described as a "planned bivouac" further in this text), you shouldn't be in a protected area. Bivouac Wikipedia Sleeping one night without a tent or a small igloo. An emergency bivouac is basically allowed everywhere. A planned bivouac is ...


9

It looks a lot like there's a power station just downstream (photo), which can be seen on openstreetmap. I suspect that the power plant is being used to respond to peak loads for which hydro is very good. That whole stretch of river has several power stations and the flow through them will be coordinated to some extent. In particular there's a dam upstream ...


7

There are multiple types of winter hiking that you may refer to. First there is the winter hiking trails. These are often found in or near ski resorts. They are often groomed and can therefore be used with normal boots, no snow shoes required. There trails are typically leading from one cable car station to another or from town to town. Lower in the valley ...


7

Having just returned from our trip, I will try to provide a description of how we planned it and how things worked out. When we arrived in Vienna we purchased a topographic map of the Gesause region at a book store. With this in hand, we decided to take a train from Vienna to Gaishorn am See, to the south of the park. The train takes three hours and isn't ...


7

It is allowed if there's no sign declaring it as Naturschutzgebiet/Naturschutzzone this is german for natural reserve if there's no such sign or you know for sure your not in such a reserve, it's safe to swim legally. However, best practice is to ask at the local tourist information center.


5

The linked topic of @Eyal is a good starting point to get an idea what to expect on those kind of hut treks. I would recommend to get information from online trip reports like on the site you linked to. They already marked the different sections of the Via Alpina where you could pick out 5 sections/days. First of all you should get something to work with ...


4

Why not try the Wilder Kaiser, it's not in Innsbruck, only some 55mins drive, but it's pretty dame awesome and very kid friendly! More than 400km of walking paths make the Wilder Kaiser mountains an absolute gem for hiking holidays. Trails include accurate directions and approximate walk times. Hiking from hut to hut There is a remarkably diverse paradise ...


3

With the information on the website and g00gle maps, I think the whole parcour should be between 1500m and max. 1600m.


2

I was there a few days ago. The highest point of the 3D course was 1800 m and starts at 1600 m. Most of the hiking trails however go up to nearly 1900 m and one is even close to 2100 m.


2

Your trail appears to follow a ski slope all the way, so you can pretty much rule out ferratas or technical climbing. Still, the snow may cover some rougher terrain in the winter (like streams that can be difficult to cross), so I'd not rely on this alone. It may not be the nicest kind of terrain to hike on, or their might be fenced-off pastures in the ...


1

I agree with the comment above. In the winter Alps, avalanches are always likely to converge. It is not enough to know the trail, you need to know the situation on this trail and it is best to take information from rescuers. As a rule, rescuers have information on routes and they monitor it, since in the Alps there are a large number of tourists and lovers ...


1

I forgot to post what we ended up doing here, so I'll do that now (better late than never) Basically, we slept two nights in Hottinger Alm, which is really close to Innsbruck. We took the "Nordkette” to Hungersberg, and from there we walked to Umbruggler Alm, had lunch, and continued on to Hottinger Alm. It's uphill, but the stop along the way made it ...


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