40

I've hiked a lot with a lot of female trekkers. And I've never seen women trekkers having any problem with any unisex/male backpacks. Most of the manufacturers keep the chest straps adjustable so that one can adjust the position of those. So I would say it makes no difference. Since a hiking backpack is meant to distribute the weight among your chest, ...


32

A mug outside the backpack is far easier to reach. In some areas, you will pass streams very often. During my first ever backpacking trip, with a group of Swedish people hiking Kaisepakte – Pessiskåtan – Lapporten – Tältlägret – Abisko in September 2005, most people had a mug hanging outside so that they could reach it immediately. Every 5 minutes or so, ...


30

The ideal weight is zero. The less weight you carry the more you will enjoy your outing. That being said, one should try to minimize their weight within reason. There exist different schools (Ultralight, super-ultralight, etc.) on what one should carry and how much it should weight. REI suggest the following categories: minimalist - Under 12 pounds (...


28

The general rule of thumb is to carry no more than a third of your body weight. That should be your max, so the answer is to carry less than that. Make your bag as light as you can. Aside from that it largely depends on your level of strength and fitness, and what you feel comfortable carrying. I tend to carry a heavier bag than most people I hike with, but ...


26

The short answer is, "it depends". Packs sold to women may have only superficial changes compared to the men's version (i.e. the color is different), but there are usually a few common differences: Shorter torso length (distance from shoulder to hip, often shorter in women). Narrower shoulder straps (men tend to have broader shoulders). Shape of shoulder ...


26

Yes there are increased risks associated with riding a lift while wearing a pack Hangups The first major risk, mentioned by Paparazzi, is hangups. These occur anytime the pack becomes entangled in the chair. These occur fairly frequently when unloading especially with chair riders unfamiliar with the hazard. The danger is compounded with inattentive lift ...


24

To me the first and foremost concern would be comfort and carrying capacity. Everything else is only considered after those 2. I recently went shopping for backpacks with my girlfriend and we noticed a couple of things regarding gendered models. Mostly there where no real differences between male and female versions. We looked at several brands and found ...


23

I was a light infantry soldier all we used to do was roll each of the ends and use electrical tape to bind them leaving alowences for adjusting straps. I also advise taking a spare roll of tape just in case you need to use the strap and then have to re bind them


23

Because the characteristic of a backpack in question is volume or how much content it can hold, not mass. An extreme example: If I fill lead into a 20l pack, I get ~225kg, if I fill styropor into a 50l pack, I get about 2.5kg. Mass is still specified sometimes to give the empty mass of a pack. You might want to specify max loaded mass as either a limit for ...


22

Put a garbage bag in the pack, with the open top of the garbage bag sticking out of the pack. Pour water into the garbage bag one liter at a time, keep track of how many liters of water you use. Use Google to convert the number of liters to any measurement you prefer. Empty the water from the garbage bag. P.S. You might want to do this outside or in a ...


21

With a dash of common sense, and a modicum of skill I'd say packs are safe on a chairlift. One winter I skied over 100 days at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. I wore a pack the vast majority of those days. I never once felt that any of my packs at any time were decreasing my safety or the safety of others on the lift, tram, or gondola. According to Outside ...


20

You can find smaller backpacks called daypacks but regarding the actual activity they are mostly around 25-35 litre. Smaller packs are often used for biking, trailrunning and as climbing backpack. The last mentioned might not be the right ones for you because you simply don't need to attach a rope or other features of those backpacks. For cycling and ...


20

Some reasons for the long waist straps are: The most backpacks have only one size for everyone, so the backpack must fit a short/ tall/ tiny/ big person. It also depends what your wear for clothes under your rucksack, if you wear it over a single shirt or over a big insulation-jacket. For alpine backpacks or traveling: the waist straps need to fit around ...


20

There are quite a few backpacks made of waterproof materials, especially among cottage manufacturers. ZPacks, Hyperlight Mountain Gear, Zimmerbuilt, Gossamer Gear, and many others manufacture packs out of Hybrid Cuben Fiber, Dimension Polyant X-Pac fabrics, or other waterproof materials. Even more mainstream manufacturers use a good deal of waterproof ...


18

Hide your pack or move it a bit off the trail. Make sure you do not overdo it and end up not being able to find it back yourself. :-) Although you are in the wood, if you are in a popular area, it is possible that other local visit the same area. I've never heard of people bringing alarms for their bags and don't recommend it. I doubt it will be of any help ...


18

The easiest way to carry a backpack is on your back. If you're looking for a bag for cycling, then you either need to invest in some pannier bags, or some bikepacks: I have a 20L Revelate seat bag on my bike and I love it, I still carry a small backpack, but I try to put all the bulky items in my seat bag. Heavy stuff should go inside a frame bag, but those ...


18

What you need is quite individual and the best way to tell what works for you is from your own experience. Some ultralight backpackers use backpacks that I would personally consider impossibly light and small (in particular in the USA), but they may be happy to lie under a thin single-layer sheet even in bad weather. Others prefer to carry a bit more for ...


17

According to the features list for The North Face Men's Borealis Pack, that is called a: Front elastic bungee for external storage


17

Personally I don't do that, because having something clanging against my pack (or my back) all day is guaranteed to drive me insane. Eating equipment goes inside my pack, along with stoves. If I need a drink during the day, I have a water bottle. If I run out of water and find a stream, I fill the water bottle. No need for a mug during the day. ...


16

Generally the far from the civilization you go, the safer your things are. Thiefs are operating there where people live or where there are a lot of people. Distant rocks, caves etc. are not their target. I have not heard of something being stolen from someone's luggage in mountains, for example. If some point is at least a few km far from the place where ...


16

That's simply elastic cord threaded through tie out loops on your bag. It's used to lash everything that can't fit inside your bag (extra layers/jacket), things that you don't want inside your bag (wet/muddy clothes or sharp pokey crampons), or things that you want quick access to onto the outside of your bag (wind breaker/gaiters/rain jacket). When I'm ...


16

I use my hip pockets mostly for holding snacks or other items that I want regular and immediate access to. When I go out on a hike I pack both hip pockets full of granola bars and other goodies, then I don't have to stop on the trail when I want a quick snack. I keep my keys in the hip pockets on the small mountain biking bag I carry every day, as well as ...


15

I almost always sleep with my backpack--in fact, I use it as part of my sleep system as I use a shorter sleeping pad, so the backpack goes under my feet. Keeping the pack in your tent gives maximum protection from the worst backcountry pests--mice and their kin. In the past I've left my pack outside covered in a large, thick trash bag. I think once I ended ...


15

Stabilizer/Load-lifter/Load-adjuster... Straps Those are stabilizer straps, also known as load lifter or load adjuster straps. You typically have another set of stabilizer straps on your waist belt as well. These straps essentially prevent your bag from flopping around on your back and help balance the load, which will ultimately lift the weight of the bag ...


15

First, what are your priorities? At one end of the scale you have fastpackers who aim to cover as much ground as possible and damn the discomfort. At the other end, you have people who want to hike a few miles and sit around a fire in their camp chairs cracking open ice-cold beers. These two groups have very different priorities. Most of us are somewhere in ...


15

Do you have 2 split rings (keyrings) with you? If so, here's how to make a buckle like that (or rather its D-ring predecessor): Attach both split rings to the upper strap, where the old buckle is/was. Pass the lower strap up through both split rings and back through the first. Here's an ASCII-art sketch before you pull it tight: ----- | //| ...


14

I haven't tried it, but it looks ridiculous. If you are going to be hiking on flat and mildly rough terrain, why not get a bike with a lot of panniers. This provides for the same carrying capacity (maybe up to 40 kg). Probably will be less expensive than the trailer. There is an obvious advantage when going flat or downhill. Bikes have larger wheels than ...


13

Yes! This is a rewarding and awesome experience. I have three children that I take hiking all the time. My youngest is almost a month old and he hasn't been out yet, but will as soon as he has a bit of neck control. I was also raised going on many hikes in my father's pack. I have the old pack that I was carried in and let me tell you, they have made leaps ...


13

I'm gonna offer a super-cheap and quick workaround for the problem: Bring along an IKEA bag (assuming there are IKEAs where you live). They are basically very large shopping bags made out of very sturdy nylon fabric. And they're extremely durable. On occasion I have used these to carry loads of 30 kilograms of rocks for a gardening project, and never had ...


13

It depends largely on the hammock size and personal preference. My friend's hammock has mesh gear pockets on the underside for storage, but he doesn't mind sleeping with the boots on or inside the hammock. The backpack can pose a bigger issue, because there usually isn't enough room with it filled up. If you empty it out and it compresses easily, give ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible