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43

It sounds like you got near a wasp nest. These can be hard to spot, especially the ones that are in the ground. The best way to avoid getting stung more is to move away, than can mean up to 10 meters, especially if you have already been stung. Some wasps and bees release pheromones when they sting, which alert others to the intruder and cause more of them ...


22

You vill have to sacrifice some convenience. I suggest inverting a wide-mouthed plastic cup as a barrier over the can. Remove the cup when you want to drink, drink from the can, and then immediately replace the cup. Eventually you will drop or knock over the cup. Wipe with the cleanest thing you have available and replace. A little dirt won't harm you. ...


21

Don't open the can far enough for a bee to get in I have a freind who drinks from soda cans by only opening them a little bit. I find it quite weird, but having tried it it doesn't really make a lot of difference. When you "pull the tab" or ringpull, just do it a little so the soda can come out, but the bees cannot get in. You can open them to various ...


20

Generally speaking bees only attack when they feel threatened or protecting their hives. Apis dorsata has been described as one of the most dangerous animals of the southeastern Asian jungles due to their threatening defensive behaviors. It is considered the most defensive of all of the honey bees, even more defensive than the African honey bee (Ellis ...


20

Yes, there is actually quite a bit of discussion you can find online. Bees in large numbers can keep hummingbirds away. They don't want to get stung either! However, you can lessen the bees by doing a couple things. The first is to maybe dilute your concentration of sugar. If you are doing a 4:1 solution of water to sugar you can do a 5:1 and that may ...


14

The more common term is "mining bees". As the name says, they build nests underground, usually in sandy ground. The other big difference between them and regular honey bees, is that they are so-called solitary bees, so they do not form hives. The nest is built by a single female, who lays eggs in several chambers and provides each with pollen and nectar. So ...


14

I actually had to research backyard beehives not long ago because our Peace Officer discovered someone in town who had hive on their property, and our land use bylaw didn't allow it. I found out that a lot of people in cities keep bees, your neighbour could have a hive and you might not even know it. Odds are most bees in your backyard are domesticated if ...


12

A swarm (used in the technical sense to mean that clump you show in your question) is about the least dangerous formation in which you can encounter bees. Their bellies are full (they eat before they swarm) they have no hive to defend, and you are basically not of interest to them. Beekeepers literally gather swarms into buckets to put them into new hives. (...


12

I can think of a few solutions: Stretch a square of mosquito netting over the mouth of the can, with a rubber band to secure it in place. Buy and use a soda can lid. Switch to 2L bottled soda and use auto-sealing bottles.


12

When I was a kid, we had like plastic lids that fit over the top of pop cans, designed to keep out the yellowjackets (wasps that like your sweet beverage). You opened a hinged trap over the can's opening to drink the product. I couldn't find the exact one, but it was similar to this: (Can Covers)


10

My Dad drinks canned beverages regularly while working outside, and his go-to solution for keeping wasps/hornets/etc out of the cans is a small disk or square of 1/2" plywood about 4" square (or diameter) placed on top of the can. If there is a gap caused by the tab sticking up a bit then he will remove the tab, but usually the weight of the piece of ...


9

This happened to me, but with a brick of pineapple juice instead of a soda can. Lucky for me, I'm not allergic to anything, but I still had to get a methylprednisolone shot just to deal with the inflammation of my tongue. In my experience, wasps will bother you if you have sweet drinks anywhere near you, no matter what you do. Even if you keep every bottle ...


9

Unfortunately, for us as normal, everyday people there is no really good way to tell how dangerous a swarm is. As Kate Gregory, has mentioned, usually a swarm is the most docile a bunch of bees as there ever was. But there is one fact that trumps all that: we people are stupid. With normal bees and normal people it would take something like 1,100 bee ...


8

This study (‘Bee Hotels’ as Tools for Native Pollinator Conservation: A Premature Verdict?) conducted on nearly 300 be hotels over three years in Toronto, Canada suggests that more introduced bees and wasps were present in the hotels than native bees. Figure 2 below shows that native bees made up approximately half of the sites occupied and brood cells. ...


8

Take a pen or fork and jam/poke it at the top of the can where the tab is connected to the top of the can. See diagram below: I've done this almost my whole life, it would look like it would be hard to drink from, but it is really easy. It's kind of like drinking from a sports bottle nozzle. Also if you're feeling a bit adventurous, aim it an arms length ...


8

Presuming that you have a modern can, the simplest solution I can think of is to rotate the ring-pull 180 degrees around its axis, so that the lever is over the opening (as per the image below, but without the straw). This may not be an infallible solution, but it should reduce the probability of a bee entering the can, and still allow you to drink in a ...


7

I have seen plenty of science nature shows where bees are pacified with smoke. However, Usually bees die after 1 sting. They don't sound like bees, and I don't know if that works on anything else I don't know how you would produce said smoke without carrying around one of the smokers that the professionals use. (sounds inconvenient) Don't wear blue. I ...


6

It's difficult to know, without a picture of the offender, whether you were stung by a bee or a wasp. While wasps typically look different, some (see Yellowjacket) are quite similar in coloring and shape, the main difference being that bees typically have fuzz, while yellowjacket wasps are smooth; not exactly an easy distinction to make in the moment. ...


6

I would like to add a little more information, if I can: The term 'Western Honeybee' (Apis Mellifera) refers to bees domesticated and bred for their ability to produce large amounts of honey. Some common breeds of these bees include: Italian Cordovan Russian Carniolan Other less common strains are often bred for desirable traits such as: being tolerable ...


6

My mother swears by a combination wasp-repellant and sunscreen that she buys from Boots in England. I see they also carry wasp repellant alone, at http://www.boots.com/en/Boots-Pharmaceuticals-Repel-Insect-Repellent-Spray-Wasp-120ml-_1207452/#detailedInfo You could poke around a little on sites like that, or just go to a largish pharmacy and see what you ...


6

I can certainly sympathise with your situation from experience — wasps especially love all kinds of sweet drinks, and will home in on them with monomaniacal persistence. I've even had them try to get in my mouth while I'm drinking from a cup, which can be a somewhat unpleasant situation. (FWIW, the most important thing to do if there's a wasp or a bee ...


5

There are a few things that could be contributing to the presence of bees and/or wasps and things that mimic them as they all have different behaviours and different means to get rid of/deter. Note that if you are allergic to bees, you probably aren't allergic to wasps as they are completely unrelated. The answer also depends on where in the world you are. ...


4

The bees in your picture are honey bees. If the bees you were seeing happened to not be honey bees, bumble bees for example, then they would most likely be wild/non-domesticated. For honey bees it could be either way. You can't tell by looking at them. Honey bees in a managed hive can throw off a swarm to become a wild colony in a tree or something. In that ...


3

This is not a definitive answer, but it may be helpful. First, if you think you may be allergic to bee or wasp stings, see your doctor, or a doctor and explain your family history and this exposure that you cannot avoid. Ask the doc if you should get an epi-pen, which is an easy, quick way to inject yourself with epinephrine. (It is expensive, but ...


3

Likely these are solitary bees. You might notice bees buzzing around your house and on wet days during the flying season check inside the holes and might see them sheltering from the rain. The only certain sign of nesting is seeing the ends of the tubes capped with either mud, leaves or fine hairs. The type of capping indicates the type of bee and it’...


3

To tag onto Charlie's answer - I will say it depends on the pesticides in use. I will give a specific example of the application of Neem Oil. (Source: I was raising honeybees to pollinate my large pumpkin patch.) Neem oil is sometimes utilized along with sodium bicarbonate to both treat various blights, as well as treat pests. Neem oil works in a couple ...


3

It looks like there isn't much you can do because most of it depends on the farmers. With that said, The farther colonies are away from fields or orchards that are treated with pesticides, the better chance the bees have against pesticide poisoning. Establish apiaries at least 4 miles from crops being treated with toxic materials and subjected to ...


1

There was a study that found that during totality, the bees stopped buzzing suddenly without any gradual slowdown. The researchers found that while the insects were happily buzzing throughout the day and during the partial phases of the eclipse, the bees went quiet the instant that the total eclipse occurred in their location. Of the 16 monitoring ...


1

Bees feed on the sweet nectar of some flowers. So this bee could be attracted to fragrances that smell sweet. Watch out for your perfume or deodorant smell. The shampoo or even air freshener for house/car that stuck to your hair or your clothes perfume might be irresistible for your new little friend.


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