4

The standard belaying method taught to beginners at a gym these days is PBUS, which you can find out about by googling. There are other methods you'll sometimes see used, usually by older climbers, but the method you were taught has never been a standard one. So to the gym employee, it just looks like you have no clue what you're doing. The main problem with ...


3

Actually, having looked at the manual online it makes more sense than I remembered. Having the active rope pass through the broad end provides more friction than if it is inserted through the thin end.


2

You were probably taught the "Waterfall Method" or "Up-Down-Slide-Slide". There are examples in https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B87LNEMW370 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5egJuxizA2k Just this year I was re-trained in this method at a youth program camp. Here's the description in the text they gave us: It is a very secure method, ...


2

It is a question of design, rather than safety: You could make a safe harness with some other combination of loops for tying in and belaying, but the current combination is familiar and has some benefits over e.g. harnesses without a dedicated belay loop. Tie-in points in modern harnesses are reinforced against abrasion. Some harnesses use brightly colored ...


2

A friend just sent me a link to an article (unfortunately only available in German), which warns that the protective layer of the carabiner that comes with the Click-Up may delevop sharp edges, causing severe damage to the rope. The pilling I observe on my rope looks pretty similar to what is shown in the photo there (although probably every rope with a lot ...


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