36

I just finished Caldwell's book Push. The big walls in Yosemite are essentially vertical deserts. Even in winter they're in the full sun much of the day. It would drop below freezing at night, but during the day temperatures would regularly get above 50 °F (10° C). In the summer the heat can be overwhelming. Aside from the difficulty of performing extremely ...


19

Reading the comments and discussing with other users helped me get a much better idea of the possible causes why we hear of so many hard (sometimes free) ascents on El Capitan and almost none on Half Dome. 1. The approach Fig. 1 - The two possible approaches to HD and the Regular NW Face route [From summitpost.org] According to mountainproject.com, there ...


9

Big wall climbers always leave their harnesses on, at most they will loosen or unstrap their leg loops while they're in their portaledge. There's really no reason to ever take off your waistbelt, as you can change your pants and shirt with it on (although maybe slightly loosened) and when you toilet you only need to take your leg loops off so you can pull ...


9

To my knowledge, all popular routes in the United States require packing out all waste. Here are the rules for Yosemite, which has good guidelines applicable everywhere: http://www.nps.gov/yose/planyourvisit/climbingtrash.htm Obviously, back country climbing might not have rangers to enforce those rules, but you should abide by the Yosemite rules ...


5

I was there in early January. While the valley was below freezing, upon the first 50 feet climb in elevation after sunrise, the air temperature was very agreeable (50+ °F/10+ °C) with lots of sun. Rejoice for there was no ice underfoot—unlike on the valley floor. Also, everyone who had been there before were beside themselves with how ...


4

Etiquette varies a great deal according to locality. In the same way that trad/bolting ethics does. Best practice would be to see if your guide book has advice for the area you are climbing in and if not speak to the locals, ie climbing shop, guides office, etc. Yosemite has some rules and advise already laid out for climbers. Elsewhere people are largely ...


2

Well, this article in National Geographic provides a clue - a number of key areas on the face have become unstable, and a large rockfall has destroyed a section of the Normal Northwest Face. Doesn't sound like fun. Here's some of the rubble at the base of the cliff:


2

One issue with Method 1 is that after C3 finishes jugging on R2, C2 needs to be able to pull R2 back to the anchor and attach the pig. If the lower end of R2 is attached to the anchor, then it may become difficult for C3 to tie in short as they are jugging since the rope could become taught. A way around this is to either attach the pendulum rope R3 to R2 to ...


1

Raising You can improve your system by adding a pulley to tend the Prusik knot. The pulley is placed on the running side of the rope below the load-bearing Prusik, and is then connected to the load-side of the rope and lifts the Prusik along with it. This lets you raise the load by pulling on the rope with both hands. ClimbingArborist.com illustrates how ...


1

No experience of Yosemite weather, and it sounds like you have your answer, and this isn't wrong, but: people don't climb hard projects just to get their name on the problem. That it's difficult is a big part of the attraction. So long as it isn't wet... there really isn't 'bad weather' for climbing, you just have to factor it into your expectations.


1

I think there's simply more to climb on El Cap. A quick look at the list of established climbs in Yosemite (http://www.yosemitebigwall.com/routes-by-difficulty) reveals that there are way more routes on El Cap than there are on Half Dome. Interestingly enough, despite the fact the cliff is significantly taller, many of Half Dome's popular routes are quite a ...


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